Rietveld Pavilion at the Kröller-Müller Sculpture Garden, Arnhem, Netherland

In 1955, Gerrit Rietveld (1884-1964) designed a pavilion for the display of small sculptures at the Third International Sculpture Exhibition in Arnhem’s Sonsbeek Park.

This ‘Sonsbeek Pavilion’ was intended as a temporary structure, and it was dismantled when the exhibition was over. However, many people had been greatly impressed by its simplicity, and ten years later, on the initiative of several Dutch architects, the building found a permanent home in the Kröller-Müller Museum’s sculpture garden, under a new name: the ‘Rietveld Pavilion’. On 8 May 1965 the pavilion was officially inaugurated with an exhibition of sculptures by Barbara Hepworth.

Today, in 2010, the museum has rebuild the structure with new materials, while adhering as closely as possible to Gerrit Rietveld’s original design. Wherever possible, parts of the 1965 pavilion that were still in adequate condition have been reused. Construction work began in January 2010 and finished in September of this year. More info, click here

Rietveld Pavilion by Gerrit Rietveld, at the Kröller-Müller Sculpture Garden
Photography by Pedro Kok

Via ArchDaily

PEDRO KOK ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

EXPO 2010 DANISH PAVILION by BIG, Shanghai, China

“When we visited the World Exhibition in Zaragoza, we were stunned by the artificial content. State propaganda in paper maché. The Danish Expo pavilion 2010 is the real deal, and not just endless talking. You can ride the city bike, take a swim in the harbor bath, and see the real Little Mermaid”, Founder of BIG, Bjarke Ingels.

Last week the Danish Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels Group at Shanghai Expo 2010 opened to the public along with the rest of the Expo.

The Danish pavilion at EXPO 2010 gives visitors the opportunity to try some of the best aspects of Danish city life themselves. Through interaction, the visitors are able to actually experience some of Copenhagen’s best attractions – the city bike, the harbor bath, playground settings, a picnic on the roof garden and the opportunity to see the authentic H.C Andersen’s Little Mermaid.

The pavilion is designed as a traffic loop created by the motion of city bikes and pedestrians tied in a knot. Over 300 free city bikes located upon the roofscape, offer the visitors a chance to experience the Danish urban lifestyle which includes biking everywhere. The loops are connected in two places. Coming from the inside, the visitors can move out onto the roof, pick up a bike and re-visit the exhibition by bike as the outdoor cycle path slips into the interior and runs along the entire exhibition before exiting onto the EXPO grounds. The sequence of events at the exhibition takes place between two parallel facades – the internal and external. The internal is closed and contains different functions of the pavilion. The width varies and is defined by the programme of the inner space. The pavilion’s external façade is made of perforated steel. In the evening time, the façade becomes a sequenced instrument of interactive light illuminating the passers-by.

The exhibition can be experienced in two speeds, as a calm stroll with time to absorb the surroundings and as a dynamic bicycle trip, where the city and city life rush past. Like a Danish city, the Danish pavilion is best experienced on foot and by bike. This way, the pavilion’s theme Welfairytales (Welfare + Fairytales) re-launches the bicycle in Shanghai as a symbol of lifestyle and sustainable urban development. When the Expo closes, the pavilion can be moved to another site in Shanghai and could function as a transfer point for Shanghai’s new city bikes.

The pavilion is a monolithic structure in white painted steel which keeps it cool during the Shanghai summer sun due to its heat-reflecting characteristics. The roof is covered with a light blue surfacing texture, known from Danish cycle paths. Inside, the floor is covered with light epoxy and also features the blue cycle path where the bikes pass through the building. The steel of the facade is perforated in a pattern that reflects the actual structural stresses that the pavilion is experiencing making it a 1:1 stress test. The blue cycle path and white concrete surfaces will further define the arrival and exit areas.

Sitting in the harbor pool at the centre of the pavilion is the real Little Mermaid from the harbor of Copenhagen. As one of three of H.C. Andersen’s fables, who is affectionally known in China as An Tung Shung, which is read by every child in China, this will be seen as a gesture of cultural generosity between Denmark and China. While the mermaid is in Shanghai her place in Copenhagen will be replaced by Ai Wei Wei’s multimedia artwork, including a live broadcast of the statue in Shanghai. Other artists include Jeppe Hein from Denmark, who designed a ’social bench’ that will run alongside the bicycle lane and adapts to its environment elastically by incorporating different functions including a bar for food and drink. The works of Martin De Thurah and Peter Funch are also included in the exhibition areas.

All photos are copyright Iwan Baan.
Special thanks to Daria Pahhota for sharing!

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Regent’s Place Pavilion by Carmody Groarke, London

London architects Carmody Groarke, have recently completed a pavilion in London. The Regent’s Place Pavilion was the result of a competition run by The Architecture Foundation in 2007.

The original competition brief called for a new pavilion to mark the Osnaburgh Street entrance to Regent’s Place, that enriches and activates the public open space at street level. Carmody Groarke’s winning concept for the pavilion, presents a pavilion as an open field of slender columns which supports a canopy eight metres above the landscape of the street.

Visible from Euston Road, the pavilion reveals various clustered densities of the vertical columns beneath its canopy, that shimmer in sunlight by day and contain intense projected ‘gold’ light by night, generating a visual moiré effect for passers-by. Its dramatic form is visible from approaching each end of Triton Street intensifing the experience of movement between 10 and 20 Triton Street, two newly-developed office buildings at the Western entrance to British Land’s Regent’s Place.

The pavilion’s design has been the product of a architectural / engineering collaboration between Arup and Carmody Groarke. Holding the 3mm plate stainless steel canopy aloft 8m, extremely slender vertical elements stand without any cross-bracing, joined only at the top with a decorative structural lattice. Extensive testing of prototypes was undertaken on full size mock-ups at the Building Research Establishment as part of the design development process.

The pavilion forms a lightweight counterpoint to the architecture of the public colonnades flanking each side of the street, relating architecturally to the height of these adjacent structures, but also inviting views across the street from one side to the other. The grain of the pavilion, from the form of the lozenge shaped canopy to the alignment of the columns in their surrounding green-granite cobbled landscape base, is turned 45 degrees to its context to form a dynamic relationship between the buildings and the public realm.

Amongst the field of elements, bespoke LED lighting is set into the pattern of the cobbled surface to up-light the pavilion’s canopy, providing all the ambient external lighting to this end of Regent’s Place.

The creation of this new ornamental pavilion within Regent’s Place, examines how the public space is defined without enclosing it. It is the latest addition to the collection of public artworks and installations at Regent’s Place, which already features works by Antony Gormley, Ben Langlands & Nikki Bell, Liam Gillick and Edward Hodges Baily.

Photographs are made by Luke Hayes.
Via Contemporist (click for more pictures)

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Lounge MS by Vaillo + Irigaray, Navarra, Spain

Spanish architects Vaillo and Irigaray designed this Lounge pavilion called MS in Navarra, Spain. The skin of the building is built with plastic tubes that resemble reeds, giving a dynamic look on the outside of the building.

The organizational scheme is due to similar patterns of micro-structures, more in line with geometric patterns of liquid and / or aerosols that Cartesian structures. In establishing a working geometry using “soft” and a unified treatment space “airy”.

The new space is conceived as a continuation of the existing fence, wrapping it all, but hidden: expressing their new identity, not as constructed element, but as a re-forested. A new plant species grown in the surrounding area … the new scalar similarity between elements of “plant” makes the proposal a new understanding of the link with the existing connection.

This species builds a base of recycled plastic tubes of different colors similar to reeds, organizing a braided flexible and deformable organic capability to adapt to any situation and geometry.

Via restaurantandbardesign
Text from the architect, click on the link below for more images!

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The Tote by Serie Architects, Mumbai, India

Chris Lee and Kapil Gupta of Serie Architects have completed the design of an banquet hall in Mumbai, India. They converted a disused building from Mumbai’s colonial past in to a new banquet hal with a restaurant and bar called ‘The Tote‘. The design was inspired by an avenue of trees on the site.

Text from the architects:

The conservation guidelines call for the preservation of the roof profile for three-quarters of the buildings and full conservation for the remaining one-quarter.

The interesting aspect of the site, however, lies not in the colonial buildings but in the open spaces covered by mature Rain Trees. These spaces are shaded throughout the year by the thinly wide spread leaves of the Rain Trees, allowing almost the entire proposed program to occur outdoors.

Our proposal attempts to continue this idea of a continuously differentiated space, with no clear boundary, into the envelope of the conservation building. A new structure is proposed within the old building envelope. The structural system adopted here is that of a tree-branch. The propagation of the branching system along the longitudinal section of the conserved building is differentiated in its growth along the transverse section. This differentiation reorganizes the old buildings with new dining programs.

Therefore each dining program (wine bar, restaurant, pre-function and banquet facilities) is captured within a different spatial volume, defined by the variable degree of the branching structure.

As the structure branches into finer structural members as it approaches the ceiling. When the branches touch the ceiling, the ceiling plane is punctured with a series of openings corresponding to the intersection of the branches with the purlins and rafters. These openings become light coves and slits.

Photographs are made by Fram Petit.

More pictures and info via Dezeen


More projects of Serie Architects on ArchiDE: Blue Frog Lounge

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Burnham Pavilion by Zaha Hadid Architects, Chicago

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Here aresome new pictures of Zaha Hadid Architects Burnham Pavilion, which opened recently in the Millennium Park in Chicago.

Hadid’s pavilion is one of two designs that are commissioned to celebrate the centenary of the Burnham Plan, which set out a blueprint for urban design in the city.

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The pavilion is composed of an intricate bent-aluminum structure, with each element shaped and welded in order to create its unique curvilinear form. Outer and inner fabric skins are wrapped tightly around the metal frame to create the fluid shape. The skins also serve as the screen for video installations to take place within the pavilion.

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Zaha Hadid Architects’ pavilion also works within the larger framework of the Centennial celebrations’ commitment to deliberate the future of cities. The presence of the new structure triggers the visitor’s intellectual curiosity whilst an intensifi cation of public life around and within the pavilion supports the idea of public discourse. The pavilion was designed and built to maximize the recycling and re-use of the materials after its role in Millennium Park. It can be re-installed for future use at another site.

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Zaha Hadid Architects’ pavilion design for Chicago’s Burnham Plan Centennial celebrates the city’s ongoing tradition of bold plans and big dreams. The project encourages reinvention and improvement on an urban scale and welcomes the future with innovative ideas and technologies whilst referencing the original organizational systems of Burnham’s plan.

Our design continues Chicago’s renowned tradition of cutting edge architecture and engineering, at the scale of a temporary pavilion. The design merges new formal concepts with the memory of bold historic urban planning. Superimpositions of spatial structures with hidden traces of Burnham’s organizational systems and architectural representations create unexpected results. By using methods of overlaying, complexity is build up and inscribed in the structure.

See ArchiDE’s other story about the Burnham Pavilion, designed by UNStudio.

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Images courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Michelle Litvin.

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Bengt Sjostrom Starlight Theatre by Studio Gang Architects, Rockford

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Here are some pictures off a very nice project in Rocford, USA by Studio Gang Architects!

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Rock Valley College wanted to develop a new regional facility for the performing arts at Starlight Theatre to replace an existing outdoor venue. Expanded facilities and a roof enclosure were needed so that performances could go on without the threat of rainouts. At the same time, there was a strong desire to maintain the sense of being outdoors. Encompassing over 135,000 S.F., the new theatre and lawn seating maintains 100% accessible pathways and strong visual connections to the surrounding campus. Under the folded, origami-like roof, an intimate social setting is created with a porous boundary to the landscape. The central theatre space forms an unexpected vertical axis to the sky; an observatory to the stars through a kinetic roof that opens in fair weather. Starlight has become a popular regional destination since its opening in 2003.

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Working with a modest budget, the strategy was to design a building that could be constructed in phases over three years to allow the College to maintain their summer performance schedule. PHASE 1 included the expanded seating bowl that seats 1100, ticket building, toilet rooms, sculpted landscape and illuminated terraces. PHASE 2 included the copper-clad proscenium, its rigging and the 30′ x 60′ translucent sliding stage doors. PHASE 3 included the faceted roof structure of wood and steel. The kinetic center sections open upward like the petals of a flower in a helical order so that each roof petal overlaps its neighbor.

Click here for more pictures on flickr!!

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion by SANAA, Londen

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This year got Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, SANAA commissioned to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in Kensington Gardens in London. The interesting about the the pavilion is its simplicity. The whole surrounding park is reflected in the aluminium roof of the structure, which is shaped to curve around the trees. The curved walls made of transparent acrylic and surrounds a cafe and auditorium.

Made of floating aluminium, drifting freely between the trees like smoke… its appearance changes according to the weather, allowing it to melt into the surroundings. No walls, it extends uninterrupted across the park with access from all sides. it is a sheltered extension of the park where people can read, relax and enjoy lovely summer days.’ -SANAA

The structure, whose free and open design co-founder Ryue Nishizawa, co founder described the open structure  as ‘a non-architecture idea, such as water or a rainbow, in a video interview on Architects Journal. The pavilion will be open to the public in Kensington Gardens from 12 july until 18 October, before being sold to a private buyer.

Previous designers for the Serpentine Gallery are Frank Gehry,Olafur Eliasson and Kjetil Thorsen,Rem Koolhaas and Cecil Balmond, Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura with Cecil Balmond, Arup, MVRDV, Oscar Niemeyer, Toyo Ito, Daniel Libeskind, 2001  and Zaha Hadid.

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Architecture photographer Iwan Baan has been documenting the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, click here for some great pictures!

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Photographs by Luke Hayes and Iwan Baan

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3XN showcase pavilion ’Learning from Nature’, Denmark

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’Learning from Nature’

Self-cleaning surfaces, phase changing materials and built-in sensors that generate energy from the footsteps of the visitors. The 3XN pavilion ‘Learning from Nature’ unites the most advanced technologies and intelligent materials in a preview of the innovative architectural design of tomorrow

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art invited the Danish architecture firm 3XN to design a pavilion demonstrating cutting edge possibilities within sustainable and intelligent materials. The result is a pavilion that is built of bio composites with integrated intelligence that creates a dynamic interaction with its physical surroundings and its users.

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Sustainability does not equal architectural compromise

The pavilion is called ‘Learning from Nature’ and everything about the pavilion is literally inspired by nature itself: The biological cycle of nature is the fundamental basis for the shape, the materials and the dynamic energy generation. The pavilion is shaped as a Moebius band to symbolize the biological cycle; and the properties of the construction are very like those of nature – for example, the pavilion has a coating of nanoparticles that helps clean the surfaces and clean the air. Additionally, the pavilion is built of biodegradable materials; and as for energy, the pavilion is 100 percent self-sufficient.

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Kim Herforth Nielsen, Principal of 3XN, comments on the project:

– The Pavilion has given us the opportunity to showcase the possibilities which exist in building with sustainable and intelligent materials. Our objective has been to show that Green Architecture can be dynamic and active.  We often think that we need to minimize use of resources at all costs. Instead of focusing on consuming the least amount of energy, we need to focus on producing and using energy and materials in a more intelligent way than is the case today.

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The development of the pavilion is a natural continuation of 3XNs extensive focus on new technologies and materials; a focus that led to the establishment of a unique in-house Research & Development unit in 2007. Since then, 3XN has built an international reputation as one of the most visionary and ambitious architecture firms in the field.

’Learning from Nature’ is unveiled today and can be seen at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, until October.

Special Thanks to Lise Roland Johansen

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Nissan Y150 Dream Front pavilion by Torafu Architects, via Dezeen

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Tokyo practice Torafu Architects have created a pavilion filled with inflated, plastic balls inside a warehouse on the Shinko Pier in Yokohama, Japan. The project was conceived for automotive company Nissan to display their PIVO 2 electric car.

Located in a warehouse on the Shinko Pier, the Nissan Motors PR project spanned two areas focusing on the theme of children and the environment; “Word Park” and “Pivo Labo”. “Word Park” is a large exhibition space that houses 16 giant bubbles ranging from 4.5m to 10m in diameter where 1 million messages are expected to fill them; whirling and dancing around as blue leaves.

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VISIT DEZEEN FOR MORE INFORMATION!!

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