Burgundy wine bar and restaurant by PSLAB Beirut, Lebanon.

Lebanon-based design firm .PSLAB beirut recently has completed the Burgundy wine bar and restaurant in Beirut, Lebanon.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections. Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Via plusmood

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Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan.

01Japanese architects Suppose Architects have completed a clinic in Kure city, Hirosihima, Japan.

“Instead of keeping places normally used for movement such as an elevator shaft or stair wells closed, we wanted to open them up to collect light, using them as lightwells to maintain the lighting coming in from above. As light travels downward through the lightwells, exterior ‘bar graph’ like apertures maintain lighting on the lower levels, and gradually decrease in number towards the upper levels. This lighting design, using the building’s positive-negative relationship between interior and exterior, makes uniform lighting on each floor possible.”

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Furthermore, much like a traditional Japanese lattice door, the placement of the structurally integral- walls and apertures makes the inside of the building difficult to see from the outside, while preserving- a clear view of the outside from within, allowing for both functionality and an ideal level of privacy on- each floor.

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By reconsidering the already in place elements of the construction,such as shape,hallways and stairwells, and lighting,we think we have created a new and highly functional standard for clinics, not through a- large operation but a very modest one. 03

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More project off Suppose Design Office on archiDE:

House in Nagoya by SDO, click here
– House in Sakuragawa by SDO,
click here
– Nature Factory by SDO
, click here
– House in Nagoya2 by SDO,
click here

Via Archdaily

VISIT SUPPOSE DESIGN OFFICE

Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud by KOZ Architectes

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Via Archinect, I’ve found these pictures of a Sport and Leisore center in Saint- Cload, France by French architects KOZ. The building contrast strongly with the urban development zone in which the center is located, behind a new block of apartments and some neo- Haussmannian offices.

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It is with the facing 1930s infant school that it empathises, extending the metaphor of the balcony courtyard, the passageways, the brick colour and the forecourt. As for the 1970s infant school next door, it maintains an obvious affnity with it in terms of shapes, only to dynamite the whole lot.

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All in all it’s an odd little castle and cubist mountain, that owes its existence to the boldness of the Saint-Cloud Town Council, which has thereby acquired facilities that have revitalised its image and opened it to the most contemporary and positive architectural thinking.

The spaces are superimposed without being separated. They communicate via visual glimpses: you see each other on all sides, you ‘feel’ each other, you can easily fnd your bearings in a building with a spatially fuid but unfamiliar layout. Nevertheless, the functional and administrative autonomy of the two activities (separate entrances and different operational timetables) is respected.

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The building uses colour very openly and assertively, with a wide palette ranging from red to green, by way of yellow, pink and orange. These colours cover the façade in wide stripes. Inside, the same colours are systematically repeated, like stepping in an oversized graffti. A colour coding that helps you locate from the outside the areas created on the inside. A means of spatial orientation for young children. An echo to street culture codes for those who crawl on what is dubbed the coolest indoor climbing wall in France,or practice on the pop fencing rows below!

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Architect: KOZ architectes
Location: Saint-Cloud, France
Image Credits: Stephan Lucas

Click here for more information!

Photos by Stephan Lucas!

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Flux, Architecture in a parametric landscape, Matsys Design

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This project called the FLUX installation, is developed in 6 months by a team of CCA faculty and students. The project explores the possibilities of parametric modeling and digital fabrication through the production of the exhibition armature. The content of the exhibition is organized through a series of thematic categories in digital practices like cellular clusters, material systems, modular assemblages and etc.

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FLUX: Architecture in a Parametric Landscape by CCA Architecture/MEDIAlab is an exhibition that focuses on the emerging field of advanced digital design. In the last two decades of architectural practice, new digital technologies have evolved from being simply representational tools invested in the depiction of existing models of architectural space to becoming significant performative machines that have transformed the ways in which we both conceive and configure space and material.

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These tools for design, simulation, and fabrication, have enabled the emergence of new digital diagrams and parametric landscapes—often emulating genetic and iterative dynamic evolutionary processes—that are not only radically changing the ways in which we integrate disparate types of information into the design process, but are also significantly altering the methodological strategies that we use for design, fabrication and construction. After the early digital explosion of the 1990’s, new forms of rigor and production have entered into the field of architecture, supporting the emergence of parametric and building information modeling and the enhanced use of computational geometry and scripting that together represent the second critical wave of digital design practices.

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That our current models of space are far more continuous, variant and complex, is specifically a result of the tools we are using to produce them, an inevitable byproduct of the ever-expanding capacities of digital computation and related fabrication technologies as these intersect with theoretical trajectories that long ago dismantled the social, functional and technological truths of the early part of this century.

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Produced using CCA’s new CNC router and advanced parametric modeling techniques, the undulating structure expands and contracts as its volume extends down the center of the long nave space. Through the use of parametric modeling and a series of custom designed scripts, the installation design can be quickly updated to address new design criteria. From the thickness of the ribs to the overall twisting geometry and perforated skins, the spatial form of the armature is controlled through a complex set of relationships defined by its formal, performative, and fabrication constraints.

Official Credits to:
Architect: CCA Architecture/MEDIAlab
Location: San Francisco, United States
Date: 2008 – 2009

More info and text, click here!

Photos by Kory Bieg
Via Matsys (info and pictures from Matsys)

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Sports complex by Alvaro Siza, Llobregat, Spain

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This Sports center in Barcelona , is designed by Alvaro Siza in 2005. The 40,000sg sports complex centre is part of a larger sports pak development that includes a new stadium for Barcelona’s football club.

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The site was a flat rectangle of empty land between the dense streets of the post-war suburb to the north and Barcelona’s ring road to the south. Access roads separate it from a school to the west and playing fields to the east.

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The building is set back from the built-up urban edge and made up of a distinct group of large interlocking volumes of white concrete which express the primary programmes within: a rectangular box for the 2,500-seat sports hall, an oval drum for the swimming pool and a long bar for the ancillary facilities. From a distance the ridge of hills that keeps Barcelona’s sprawling suburbs pressed against the sea and gives the city much of its topographical character emerge above the buildings. The scarred concrete profile of the sports hall fits effortlessly into the tableau with the line of tree-covered outcrops on the horizon.

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Two ramps, each the size of a town square, rise up from the car park and meet at an entrance 4m above the ground. The stilted curves and monolithic materiality of the sports hall disassociate it from other big out-of-town sheds and evoke memories of landforms, while the ramps imply that you have to climb some pre-existing terrain before you can enter the building. These gestures begin to detach you from the reality of the building’s lacklustre surroundings, a process that continues inside to become the main ordering force of the building.

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Photos by Fernando Guerra /Via CubeMe

For more info and pictures, click here!

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The Melbourne Recital Centre by ARM, Melbourne, Australia

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Ashton Raggatt McDougal (ARM) architects designed the Melbourne Recital Centre and the neighbouring Melbourne Theatre Company helping to transform the formerly derelict Southbank area of the city in to the dynamic district it has now become. Formely they got honoured with the 2009 Victorian Architecture Medal winning highest accolades in three categories for public architecture, interior design as well as urban design.

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The entrance begins with the dramatic facade in 3D iridescent steel tubing folds that bends against black aluminium. The interior, is a 500-seat hall noticeably without a balcony or mezzanine space, but still allowing exceptional site lines to the stage regardless.

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The most striking element that you can find inside, is the World Wall in the main theatre where 70 quotes from different plays are illuminated when the stage is dark. The building also houses a full rehearsal hall that can be used as an event space or a smaller performance space, as well as a café and bar at the front of the house.

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Short news text about the award:

The recital centre and MTC buildings by ARM and the urban transformation of their formerly neglected Southbank site are honored with the 2009 Victorian Architecture Medal for successfully crossing design boundaries and taking out the top awards in three categories: the William Wardell Award for public architecture; th

e Marion Mahony Award for interior architecture and the Joseph Reed Award for urban design.

Chair of juries, Philip Goad, says the combined buildings make a significant contribution to Melbourne’s arts precinct and may well expand current audiences, sentiments echoed in the Victorian Medal jury citation.

“The robust sculptural facades have already become iconic and the changes to traffic and pedestrian patterns at an urban level have transformed the area into an active domain,” praised the jury.

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Photos by John Gollings

Via Bustler

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JS Bach Chamber Music Hall by Zaha Hadid Architects, Manchester

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A few weeks ago, Zaha Hadid Architects have built an installation at Manchester Art Gallery to house the performances of music by Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

The structure, a translucent, fabric membrane stretched over a steel structure suspended from the ceiling divides and encloses the space, creating a stage, enclosure for the audience and passages into and out of the auditorium. The installation is designed for the Manchester International Festival, the venue hosts a series of concerts which started last Friday and continue until 18 July. Concert details are on the MIF website.

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The following is from Zaha Hadid Architects:

A voluminous ribbon swirls within the room, carving out a spatial and visual response to the intricate relationships of Bach’s harmonies. As the ribbon careens above the performer, cascades into the ground and wraps around the audience, the original room as a box is sculpted into fluid spaces swelling, merging, and slipping through one another.

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“The design enhances the multiplicity of Bach’s work through a coherent integration of formal and structural logic. A single continuous ribbon of fabric swirls around itself, creating layered spaces to cocoon the performers and audience with in an intimate fluid space.” said Hadid.

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The process of realizing the design involved architectural considerations of scale, structure and acoustics to develop a dynamic formal dialogue inseparable from its intended purpose as an intimate chamber music hall.

A layering of spaces and functions is achieved through the ribbon wrapping around itself, alternately compressing to the size of a handrail then stretching to enclose the full height of the room. Circulatory and visual connections are continually discovered as one passes through the multiple layers of space delineated by the ribbon. The ribbon itself consists of a translucent fabric membrane articulated by an internal steel structure suspended from the ceiling. The surface of the fabric shell undulates in a constant but changing rhythm as it is stretched over the internal structure.

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It varies between the highly tensioned skin on the exterior of the ribbon and the soft billowing effect of the same fabric on the interior of the ribbon. Clear acrylic acoustic panels are suspended above the stage to reflect and disperse the sound, while remaining visually imperceptible within the fabric membrane.

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Images courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, © Luke Hayes.

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Za-Koenji Public Theatre by Toyo Ito, Tokyo, Japan

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Recently I saw some  impressive pictures of the Za Koenji Public Theatre on dezeen which I wanted to share with you!

The building is a contemporary performing arts theatre that produces, presents and supports music, dance, drama and storyteling in the Suginami area of Tokyo, designed by the Japanese architect  Toyo Ito.

Via Dezeen!

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VISIT IWAN BAAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Sheet Lightning Cafeteria by Die Baupiloten, Berlin, Germany

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The Baupiloten design a this new cafetaria within the framework of a new masterplan for the remodeling of the TO Berlin’s main building.  The cafetaria connects two courtyards and provides the space between a new function. 

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The different seasons dictates the color of the light drops. The warmer the outside temperature, the cooler the light color. (and conversely) In the winter the lights have a warm red and orange color as you can see on the pictures. In spring and fall, the colors mix together. Secondly, the time of the day determines the brightness of the light. The diverse lighting created by the ‘ceiling drops’ also influences the  room height.

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The ceiling lining is composed of eight luminous, tear-shaped textile elements which break the formal dominance of the room’s constructive beams. These various forms of lighting affect the perception of height and space. Installed within the volume of the sound absorbing drops are red fluorescent tubes directed downwards and blue fluorescent tubes directed upwards. Together, the lights give off a deep pink glow. The form of the light drops is generated from the pulling forces of the material’s own weight. The underside of the material is formed by a faintly transparent white artificial turf that not only distributes light but also regulates room acoustics.

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Architects: Die Baupiloten
Location: Berlin, Germany
Client: TU Berlin
Project year: 2008
Photographs: Jan Bitter

Via Archdaily / Info and pictures from the architect’s website

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Zenith Strasbourg by Massimiliano Fuksas, France

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By its playful form and character, the Zenith music hall contributes to the great Varietee Theaters which were built since the Zenith building in Paris was erected in 1984. The new Zenith building is an important project for the exhibition area in Strasbourg. It will be the new attraction which will give impulses to the future development of the city’s infrastructure.

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The concept of the design is based on a modular and a well balanced organization of the different elements: good views for all spectators, best acoustics and an optimized cost management already addressed during the concept phase of the design. The building is to be understood as a single, unifying and autonomous sculpture. By layering and rotating the ellipsoid metal façade structure, the design receives a very dynamic character. This is underlined with the translucent textile membrane, which covers the steel-frame and creates magnificent light effects. These orange membranes also cover the volume of the music hall itself. This is the heart of the building: a totally enclosed and protected space, which creates a special theatre atmosphere. Projections on the outer skin create playful effects and convert the façade into a huge billboard. The inner experience is transmitted to the outside thought out the transparent skin: the whole building becomes a ‘light sculpture’.

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Architect: Massimiliano Fuksas
Location: Strasbourg, France
Programme: Zenith Music Hall (10.000 seats)
Construction year: 2008
Site: Municipality of Eckbolsheim, Strasbourg
Client: Città di Strasburgo (CUS) Delegate
Photographs: Moreno Maggi & Philippe Ruault

Via Archdaily click for More info and pictures!

VISIT MASSIMILIANO FUKSAS

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