Slit House by Eastern Design Office, Shiga, Japan

“This house is made “only” by the slits. There is no window. The wall of 105m lengths with 60 slits surround the site realizes the architectural space in this narrow and long site. No other architecture has ever been realized by such method.”

Japanese architects EASTERN design office designed this house with slits instead of windows in Shiga, Japan.

This house is made “only” by the slits. there is no window. The wall of 105m lengths with 60 slits surround the site realizes the architectural space in this narrow and long site. No other architecture has ever been realized by such method.

This conceptual sculpturing by the slits is poles apart from glass-heavy contemporary architecture. This method with the slits is our challenge to “window”. This challenge is an experiment to innovate a design method of architecture. The concept to compose the architecture just by the slits directly figures this architecture. This simple method distinguishes the outline of the entire figure and abstracts the stance of the architecture. The site is located in an old city in Japan, where many private houses stand in a row. The site size is depth of 50m and width of 7.5m. One of two narrow frontages faces a street and the other faces a river. We designed a long wall that encloses this narrow and long site. The slits open this enclosure.

The 140mm width slits screen inner privacy from view from outside. But the slits bring 60 light into the house. This proposes one method to live in a dense residential area in Japan where houses stand side by side. 80 years old woman lives in this house. The house presents her both a life space with a soft light and an interesting experience of scale unlikely in a house. More info, go to architecturelab

Photographs are made by Koichi Torimrua.
Via
architecturelab

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KRE House by Takuya Tsuchida, Tokyo, Japan

Takuya Tsuchida designed this so called KRE House that is located in the posh Shirokane area of Tokyo. This unique house has a relaxed and contemporary interior, on the ground floor is a 9 car garage with an elevator lift that brings the favorite car of the moment right into the living room.

Photographs are made by Koichi Torimura

Via Whatwedoissecret

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House in Higashi-Matsubara by Ken’ichi Otani Architects, Tokyo, Japan

Ken’ichi Otani Architects completed this renovation and the extension of an eighteen-year-old house for two families in Setagaya, Tokyo.

House in Higashi-Matsubara

This is a renovation and expansion project of an eighteen-year-old house for two families. Only the part for the young family was renovated with an addition. The house is located in a reasonably good residential area of suburban Tokyo. The site has a good garden with abundant trees on the south side. A tall orange tree provides a nice shade over the west side road.

A part of the existing concrete retaining wall along the street on the west edge was removed to build a new approach staircase to the renovated house toward the orange tree. The new addition was built on the south side of the young family unit facing medium high bush. An exterior wall on the west side of the addition leads to an entrance porch under the orange tree, but limits the view of the private garden from the approach staircase.

A large living-dining area is created by the addition on the south side of the existing part, and also by removal of a bed room. The living-dining area is surrounded by separate walls of similar length, but with various angles each other to realize the sense of continuity of the old and added parts.

Each of interior walls and ceilings, painted in light yellow color and directed in different angles, responds to the variation of outside light with time of a day in a different manner, and also can reflect the subtle change of color of the garden plants with season.

The finishing of the exterior walls and the gate was selected similar to the old part so that the addition does not affirm nor deny the old existence, but simply inherit what are there. The contrast between the new addition and the existing environment is kept minimal; unless one looks at them carefully, one does not recognize the new addition, as if the chameleon is hard to find in an adjusted environment.

Architect :Ken’ichi Otani / Ken’ichi Otani Architects
Location : Setagaya, Tokyo, JAPAN
Principal use : Residence
Total floor area : 281.43m2
Construction :2009.Aug.-2009.Nov.
Photo :Koichi Torimura

Special thank to Ken’ichi Otani for sharing!

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House in Hiro by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan

Again, another interesting project of Japanese architects Suppose Design Office.

The site is located in a shopping district alongside the main highway, a harsh place to satisfy the demands of a client desiring a home with bright gardens. There are no outdoor gardens here, so we decided to plan outthe kind of place that you could almost call a real garden, by bringing to the indoors materials that evoke – elements of the outdoors – garden-like elements such as light and raw materials.

By setting up garden rooms that at first sight make you feel as if you are in a real outdoor garden – despite being indoors – we have created a distinction between the indoors and outdoors, and by putting characteristically “outdoor” things such as plants and bicycles in the rooms, as well as books, artwork, and pianos, we have portrayeda life in which these elements are all mingled.

We struggled to achieve this new outdoors-like form by changing the way we looked at things just a little bit, by unconsciously recognizing these “inside and outside” elements. The garden rooms, where the indoors and outdoors mingle, show that rather than being a home that cannot allow the sort of metamorphosis it has seen thus far, this home is comfortable with these changes.

Photographs are made by Toshiyuki Yano.

Other projects of Suppose Design Officeon ArchiDE:

+ House in Koamicho by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Buzen House by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Lodge by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan
+ House in Otake by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan
+ House in Nagoya by Suppose Design Office, Aichi, Japan
+ House in Sakuragawa, Tokyo by Suppose Design Office
+ Nature Factory by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Nagoya2 by Suppose Design office, Japan

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Les Aventuriers by Shun Hirayama Architecture, Japan

Shun Hirayama designed this house that is located in Kanagawa, Japan. The client couple, who are friends of mine, and I visited there, when the project was initiated.
Walking around in the pre-project site, where too many tall trees stand on, views changed variously, because of the slanted land’s height differences.

The experience was comparable to a pleasure of wandering in a forest. Taking a walk on a hillside or feel like so even inside the house had become a concept and we went on to continue the project, taking the slope positively.

Firstly, we started to define what kind of places should be there on the hill and then images of four living places were formed: a kitchen and a dining space near a road that becomes an approach, a living space at a good view point, bedrooms at positions to look out the hill, a bathroom at an airy location, and so on. After that, we put these places to individual volumes, converted them to wooden masses and shaped them, conforming to each site shape and condition, as if carving sculpture.

The lateral of the road and the north surface are positioned parallel to the site boundaries, and the east surface, where the kitchen is, is slanted toward the south in order to let light in. The face of the living space is slightly inclined toward the north, so as to avoid seeing the neighborhood’s building. As a result, gradually overlapping each other, the four masses were formed into one shape.

After the outline of the building emerged, we proceeded to create the interior spaces. First of all, we produced a path that possesses comfortable straight eyesight, analogous to walking between trees. The path connects the inside and the outside, and again backs to the inside without a dead-end. A bridge becomes a part of the journey.

On the finishes of the floors, various kinds of wooden floor that were chosen to match the assorted atmosphere are laid like carpets. In the center of a concrete floor that meets the ground, thin trees are arranged so as to look like a path between rice paddies.

We forwarded the design, piling up stories little by little, as if animals create their nest steadily. The traces of the thoughts and processes appear remarkably. In the interior of the building that was shaped to fit the landform, walls set in diverse angles, various ceiling heights and ten different floor levels exist and in the each space dissimilar shades live.

The wind that enters inside the one-room interior space feels like they came between trees, and it feels like sitting on a natural stump, when sitting on a slight level difference.

Special thanks to Shun Hirayama for sharing!

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House in Koamicho by Suppose Design Office, Japan

Japanese architects Suppose Design Office have completed a house in Hiroshima, Japan. Called House in Koamicho, the two-storey residence is situated on a long narrow plot.

When we normally feel “interior” or “exterior”, what are the causes? And what are the causes of feeling “open” or “narrow”?

Two glazed spaces between rooms are planted with small trees and break up the succession of rooms, affording glimpses of the outside.

The information below is from Suppose Design Office:

This is house designed with much thought to how, from those root causes, we define the conditions of a space. In a long, narrow space, we constructed walls, and by laying out a space in which we experience many rooms, we turn “narrowness” into “openness.

“Further, taking rooms and gardens as equivalent, we created spaces that are like the exteriors, calling them “garden rooms”. By moving from room to another room, we can alternately experience interior and exterior, and they become the place where every rooms are connected to the exterior.

Here we have succeeded in realizing a space, which pass traditional definitions tomaterialized a new relationship between – interior and exterior.

Photographs are made by Toshiyuki Yano.

Other projects of Suppose Design Officeon ArchiDE:

+ House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Buzen House by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Lodge by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan
+ House in Otake by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan
+ House in Nagoya by Suppose Design Office, Aichi, Japan
+ House in Sakuragawa, Tokyo by Suppose Design Office
+ Nature Factory by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Nagoya2 by Suppose Design office, Japan

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63.02° House by Sschemata Architecture Office, Tokyo, Japan

A small house, designed by Sschemata Architecture Office,  built at 63.02° to the road. The house is located in Nakana, Tokyo and has a floor space of 71.4 m2.

63.02°is built on a built up area in Tokyo. This small building is used as SOHO and an apartment for rent. This building is cut on the axis line inclined to a front road by 63.02°. The window in this building concentrates there. You can see the intersection by seeing the outside through the windows.

In front a splendid cherry blossoms tree stands. It is only fine sight in this building that is acquired in the center.

Photographs are by made Takumi Oota

Other projects of Sschemata Architecture Office on archiDE:

+ NADiff a/p/a/r/t by Schemata Architecture Office

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Tokinokura Lavatories Shimodate by Shuichiro Yoshida Architects, Japan

Tokyo studio Shuichiro Yoshida Architects have completed a tall narrow toilet block in Chikusei City, Japan.

The project is located in Chikusei City in Ibaraki Prefecture, approximately 60km north-east from Tokyo in Japan. In this region, there are historical storage buildings of stone since early 20th century, although the most of these buildings, called “Ishi-Kura” in Japanese, were demolished and disappeared from the townscape due to the city development after the World War II.

A volunteer group in the region obtained one of the storage buildings and maintains it as their activity base for discovering the region-specific historical and cultural heritages. The building is named as Tokinokura, which means a storage persists in past and future.

Although Tokinokura is in good condition and useful for the volunteer group, there was no lavatories for the visitors and staffs. In autumn 2008, the group organized a public design competition for the lavatories, which they desired for long time. This design was selected out of 76 applied design proposals and constructed in Feburary – May 2009.

This small lavatories building includes two booths for men and women. Although the floor area is only 8.62㎡, there is rich space above the booths. It is intended that the lavatories starts new history with Tokinokura. It means not only to preserve the region-specific landscape but also to create new landscape in future. Visitors in the lavatory booth could experience quiet and rich feeling, enjoying the soft light from the upper window and the framed view of the old stone wall of Tokinokura.

Via Dezeen

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House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan

Another project by Suppose Design Office , this time a renovation of a house in Hiroshima city, Japan. The project involved gutting the exisiting interior and inserting a new half- height partitions.

Usually, when we distinguish between the inside and outside of the buildings we make an unconscious judgment of the direction and strength of the sunlight, the sensation of the ground, the types of sounds flooding our surroundings and their power.

The renovations currently being done involved totally gutting this building’s frame and have left an amount of new living space; the existing partition beams had been hanging partition walls that divided the now-open space.

The open space that had been surrounded and closed off “within” these hanging partition walls now enjoys a soft light coming from underfoot that calms the place; the “external” open space outside of these partitions seems like a garden-like place with lots of light coming in. Indeed the open spaces within the building are planned to make it seem as if you had entered a garden.

Photographs are made by Toshiyuki Yano.
Via Dezeen

+ Buzen House by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Lodge by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan
+ House in Otake by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan
+ House in Nagoya by Suppose Design Office, Aichi, Japan
+ House in Sakuragawa, Tokyo by Suppose Design Office
+ Nature Factory by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Nagoya2 by Suppose Design office, Japan

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DG House by Geneto, Tokyo, Japan

“The scenes of daily life”

Japanese architects Geneto have designed a house in Tokyo dominated by plywood structures. Called DG-House, the project features two main structures. The first combines bookcases, seating, a staircase and a mezzanine, while the second contains the kitchen.

The composition was decided by associating the client’s “scenes of daily life”, with the context being thought from the site and laying it out in three dimensions. Some private rooms are on the ground floor and the second floor is made as one big room, dividing each space with furniture. In DG House the studio thought of furniture as volumes to produce various areas rather than functional furniture. The structured volumes are made with a 24mm plywood frame.

Photographs are made by Takumi Ota.

Via designboom

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