House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan

The unique design of the house is a relationship between the building and its exterior elements.

Japanese architects Suppose Design Office completed this house in Hiroshima that is surrounded by an offset concrete shell to create a series of triangular terraces between the inner and outer walls. The house was designed for a couple with two children, and has a garage, master bedroom and entrance hall on the ground floor.

On the first and second storeys the spaces between the wall and house have been filled with perforated steel, creating terraces that allow light into the courtyards below.  Rooms sit at an angle to the surrounding wall, giving the terraces and courtyards their triangular shape.

The external wall is made of reinforced concrete while the house is a steel frame construction.

Photographs by Takumi Ota.


Other projects of Suppose Design Officeon ArchiDE:

+ House in Obama by Suppose Design Office, Fukui, Japan
+ House in the Kodaira by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Koamicho by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Buzen House by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Lodge by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan
+ House in Otake by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan
+ House in Nagoya by Suppose Design Office, Aichi, Japan
+ House in Sakuragawa, Tokyo by Suppose Design Office
+ Nature Factory by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Nagoya2 by Suppose Design office, Japan

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House R by Bevk Perović Arhitekti, Bohinj, Solvenia

Slovenian architecture firm Bevk Perovic Arhitekti designed this house that combines a contemporary style inspired by traditional forms with the typical alpine house.

The house has an external wooden skin with sliding panels that reveal large and small openings to maximize the entry of natural light. This modern minimal exterior is complemented by an equally simple interior with large windows, a bright and spacious layout, and a white palette accented by naturally finished woods.

A main staircase both divides the individual living areas in this open-concept layout, but also connects one floor to the next.

Photography by Miran Kambič

Other projects of Bevk Perović Arhitekti on ArchiDE:
+ House D by Bevk Perovic arhitekti, Ljubljana, Slovenia
+ House R by Bevk Perović Arhitekti, Bohinj, Solvenia

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House V by PlanB and Mazzanti Architects, Colombia

Plan B Architects and Mazzanti Architects designed this House that is located near Bogota in Colombia.

Via mad
Photography by Rodrigo Davila

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MAZZANTI ARCHITECTS

Hangar Ostréicole by Raum Architecture, Locoal-Mendon, France

French based office Raum Architecture completed this hangar/ house made for oyster cultivation and living quarters in Locoal-Mendon, France.

Photography by Audrey Cerdan
Via Raum

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Culture Campus Vleuterweide ‘Informatieplein’ by AEQUO, Utrecht, Netherland

The Dutch design studio AEQUO have designed info station inside the Culture Campus Vleuterweide in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The info station is shaped as the interior space of a monastery. It contains one large monastery bench, which comprises a multitude of functions upon closer inspection.

Via Contemporist

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House 6 by Marcio Kogan, São Paulo, Brazil

Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan has recently completed this house in São Paulo, Brazil.

The House 6 project was thought out after the client had made an important request. The family wanted a covered external space to be used for everyday living. This space should be used to organize all the social life of the house.

The Brazilian tropical climate suggests ample use of these solutions in vernacular as well as in modern architecture.  Beginning from the colonial, Brazilian architecture has usually incorporated a space that was known as the veranda. Verandas are covered linear spaces in front of the living room and bedrooms which act as the intermediary between the interior and exterior.

In the House 6 project, the idea of the veranda has been reinvented. The veranda is not exactly in front of the living room, disposed longitudinally, but, rather, perpendicular to it. The wooden pillars that give support to the structure and the clay tiles of traditional verandas have been substituted by modern pilotis that support a volume of flat slabs.

The veranda of House 6, nonetheless, still remains an open space and, simultaneously, opens to the garden and the pool. It is a living room, a TV room and an extension of the internal kitchen.

This space, then, structured the entire architecture of the house, organized in two transversal volumes and an annex in the back that holds a home office. The lower volume houses the utilities, the kitchen and the living room with door-frames that can be recessed into the walls, and thereby entirely opening the internal space to either side.  This sets the cross-ventilation and an unfettered contiguous view of the garden.

The upper volume has the private area of the house with the bedrooms and, on the third floor there is a small multiple-use living room alongside an upper deck.

Architecturally, the space of the veranda, located under the bedrooms, would have a low ceiling-height, to create a warm feeling. The sum of the structure of the two perpendicular volumes and the living room ceiling-height would result in a very high ceiling.

Thus, it was decided to make the living room lower in relation to the veranda and the garden. This result made it possible to have a house with elongated proportions and the viability of a covered external pleasant space to be used on both warm and cool days in the city of São Paulo.

Via Contemporist
Photographs are made by Rômulo Fialdini

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Hidden House by Standard, Los Angeles, USA

“We’re thrilled with the way the house evolved,” adds Standard Principal and Co-Founder Silvia Kuhle. “Hidden House offers the ultimate country living experience in the middle of an urban environment.”

Los Angeles firm Standard has recently won the Single Family Housing category at the 40th Annual Los Angeles Architectural Awards with their project “Hidden House”.

Hidden House is located on a serene 7-acre site (in Glassell Park where the paved road ends at an old hand written sign marking the entrance to “Hidden Valley.”) The property, which can only be accessed via a half-mile unpaved road, offers expansive views of the city but seems a world away from Los Angeles at the same time.

Anticipating city restrictions associated with building on a site far removed from the street, Standard opted to keep the structure of the existing two-bedroom house substantially intact. At the same time the architects designed an entirely new home around the original space.

Today, the original two-bedroom cottage is incorporated into the house as the living and dining room. Standard added a new kitchen, family room, office, garage, master bedroom suite and kids bedroom, essentially doubling the volume of the house from 1580 sf to 3500 sf. The new house is arranged around two main courtyards. The main living spaces open up onto the interior courtyard, while the exterior courtyard looks out over the city in the distance. The self-contained cubes are arranged around the original footprint in such a way that they make order of the disorder. At a later date, the family may add on additional bedrooms per their original plan.

Hidden House also features several sustainable materials and features, ranging from the redwood cladding, to reclaimed endgrain block wood, to the cork flooring in the office, and highly efficient appliances/equipment. The design allows for excellent cross ventilation and day lighting, reducing the need to run forced-air conditioning or heat or energy-consuming electrical lighting. The house is insulated with sustainable cotton and built to be solar-ready. The garden is planted with native landscape and vegetables.

Photographs by Benny Chan

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House VVDB by dmvA, Mechelen, Belgium

Belgium Architects dmvA completed this interior for a post-modern pyramid house in Mechelen, Belgium.

VVDB house was mentioned as a statement for the eighties, since it has the main characteristics of eighties period building in Flanders, Belgium. The characteristics can be seen from the roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone, and many-colored aluminum joinery.

In the eighties architect Jan Van Den Berghe built his own house on a marvellous spot, close to the channel Mechelen-Brussels. Roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone and many-coloured aluminium joinery, were the main characteristics of this period building periode in Flanders.

The post-modern pyramid house was a statement for the seventies/eighties. Architect Van den Berghe requested dmvA to refurbish his own house for his daughter. No spectacular alterations, but subtle interventions, round perforations through the floors, a new central spiral stair, ‘whitening’ of the floors. Altogether an architectural attitude based on respect!

More info and pictures on Archdaily!
Pictures by Frederik Vercruysse

Other articles of DMVA on ArchiDE:
+ Blob vB3 by DMVA
+ House S by dmvA Architecten, Mechelen, Belgium

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Earl’s Gourmet Grub by FreelandBuck, Los Angeles, USA

FreelandBuck projected Earl’s Gourmet Grub, an artisanal deli and gourmet market in Los Angeles, USA.

Architectural computation is generally promoted in relation to high-tech building systems and iconic towers. Earl’s Gourmet Grub is a test case in how computational architecture can enrich everyday use. The restaurant was designed with contemporary technology to fit an old-world sensibility inspired by its food. Torquing ceiling surfaces and inscribed digital patterns are combined with a rich material and color palette to evoke both technological refinement and the more rustic feel of alpine landscapes and Viennese cafes.

Earl’s is an artisanal deli and gourmet market that opened in May 2010 in Los Angeles. The 1000sf. tenant improvement is conceived of as an interior landscape; a variable and shifting space defined by a series of torqued ceiling surfaces and light ’scoops’. The ceiling creates an airy, light-filled canopy with local intensities modulated by wood ‘baffles’ of oscillating depth. These rhythmic undulations both subdivide the linear space into a series of spatial pockets and produce dynamic spatial continuity from front to back.

The clients, Yvonne McDonald and Dean Harada, requested a contemporary architectural identity but one that evoked the rustic or alpine qualities of the fresh ingredients used in the food. The west wall, which spans the entire depth of the space, is embossed with an image of the Alps abstracted as a series of rectangular computational ‘bits’. The result – alpine picturesque run through a computational filter – evokes neither pure landscape nor pure technology, opening up a wider range of associations.

Photography by Lawrence Anderson/Esto

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Kilico hair salon by Makoto Yamaguchi,Tokyo, Japan

Japanese architect Makoto Yamaguchi has completed a hair salon in the basement of a Tokyo building, showcasing the patchwork of alterations made by previous occupants of the space. Called kilico., the project involved patching the floor to make it flat and coating the various textures of the walls with white paint. The hair salon is located Daikanyama, one of Tokyo’s trendiest areas.

Some more information from the architect:

Even though the interior layout had basically remained the same, there were many traces left behind by previous occupants on the floor and walls – a flat mortar wall next to an unfinished concrete block wall, and a whole host of dents and depressions of various sizes in the coarse concrete floor. We decided to leave these textural details intact and incorporate them into the design for the new salon, so we painted the walls over in white and filled the depressions of various sizes with mortar.

Looking at the white wall that extends downwards from the ceiling until the floor, for example, you can see an entire gradient of different textures. The surface of a concrete block gradually changes into a surface riddled with holes that probably appeared when it was dismantled, which then segues into a panel with a completely flat and even finish, ending up as a fairly flat surface at the very bottom. After we had filled the depressions in the floor with mortar in order to make it flat, a map-like pattern emerged – what we call a “time map”.

The design of ‘kilico.’ is based on these vestiges of past “time” – traces of previous incarnations of this building that have been given a new lease of life.

Photos by Ken’ichi Suzuki.

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