Freshwater House by Chenchow Little Architects, Sydney, Australia

Chenchow Little Architects designed this beach house in Sydney, Australia. It developed the idea of the operable façade to mediate between the requirements for privacy and shading on a relatively public site adjacent to the beach.

The resulting building is made up of three distinct parts; a podium base, a garden/ living space, and a bedroom volume clad with operable screens; each designed with unique spatial and material qualities.

Via thecoolist
Photography by John Gollings

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House R by Bevk Perović Arhitekti, Bohinj, Solvenia

Slovenian architecture firm Bevk Perovic Arhitekti designed this house that combines a contemporary style inspired by traditional forms with the typical alpine house.

The house has an external wooden skin with sliding panels that reveal large and small openings to maximize the entry of natural light. This modern minimal exterior is complemented by an equally simple interior with large windows, a bright and spacious layout, and a white palette accented by naturally finished woods.

A main staircase both divides the individual living areas in this open-concept layout, but also connects one floor to the next.

Photography by Miran Kambič

Other projects of Bevk Perović Arhitekti on ArchiDE:
+ House D by Bevk Perovic arhitekti, Ljubljana, Slovenia
+ House R by Bevk Perović Arhitekti, Bohinj, Solvenia

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Pittman Dowell Residence by Michael Maltzan Architecture, La Crescenta, California

Via Architecturelab i found this amazing house, designed by MICHAEL MALTZAN ARCHITECTURE.

The project is a residence for two artists. Located 15 miles north of Los Angeles at the edge of Angeles forest, the site encompasses 6 acres of land originally planned as a hillside subdivision of houses designed by Richard Neutra. Three level pads were created but only one house was built, the 1952 Serulnic Residence. The current owners have over the years developed an extensive desert garden and outdoor pavilion on one of the unbuilt pads. The new residence, to be constructed on the last level area, is circumscribed by the sole winding road which ends at the Serulnic house.

More @ architecturelab
Photographs are made by
Iwan Baan

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House V by PlanB and Mazzanti Architects, Colombia

Plan B Architects and Mazzanti Architects designed this House that is located near Bogota in Colombia.

Via mad
Photography by Rodrigo Davila

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MAZZANTI ARCHITECTS

Hangar Ostréicole by Raum Architecture, Locoal-Mendon, France

French based office Raum Architecture completed this hangar/ house made for oyster cultivation and living quarters in Locoal-Mendon, France.

Photography by Audrey Cerdan
Via Raum

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Villa Mecklin by Huttunen Lipasti Pakkanen Architects, Finland

Villa Mecklin designed by Huttunen-Lipasti-Pakkanen Architects is located in the Finnish archipelago and was built in 2008.

It sits in a small depressions in the rock, its sheltered terrace extending over the summit of the rock.  In connection with the shoreline sauna, there is also a stove-heated cabin for guests.

The building materials selected for Villa Mecklin are uncontrived, basic ones suited for the archipelago. All wood surfaces have been left untreated and will turn grey naturally.

The floor area of the villa is 70m2 and the sauna is 20m2.

Via Huttunen-Lipasti-Pakkanen Architects

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House 6 by Marcio Kogan, São Paulo, Brazil

Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan has recently completed this house in São Paulo, Brazil.

The House 6 project was thought out after the client had made an important request. The family wanted a covered external space to be used for everyday living. This space should be used to organize all the social life of the house.

The Brazilian tropical climate suggests ample use of these solutions in vernacular as well as in modern architecture.  Beginning from the colonial, Brazilian architecture has usually incorporated a space that was known as the veranda. Verandas are covered linear spaces in front of the living room and bedrooms which act as the intermediary between the interior and exterior.

In the House 6 project, the idea of the veranda has been reinvented. The veranda is not exactly in front of the living room, disposed longitudinally, but, rather, perpendicular to it. The wooden pillars that give support to the structure and the clay tiles of traditional verandas have been substituted by modern pilotis that support a volume of flat slabs.

The veranda of House 6, nonetheless, still remains an open space and, simultaneously, opens to the garden and the pool. It is a living room, a TV room and an extension of the internal kitchen.

This space, then, structured the entire architecture of the house, organized in two transversal volumes and an annex in the back that holds a home office. The lower volume houses the utilities, the kitchen and the living room with door-frames that can be recessed into the walls, and thereby entirely opening the internal space to either side.  This sets the cross-ventilation and an unfettered contiguous view of the garden.

The upper volume has the private area of the house with the bedrooms and, on the third floor there is a small multiple-use living room alongside an upper deck.

Architecturally, the space of the veranda, located under the bedrooms, would have a low ceiling-height, to create a warm feeling. The sum of the structure of the two perpendicular volumes and the living room ceiling-height would result in a very high ceiling.

Thus, it was decided to make the living room lower in relation to the veranda and the garden. This result made it possible to have a house with elongated proportions and the viability of a covered external pleasant space to be used on both warm and cool days in the city of São Paulo.

Via Contemporist
Photographs are made by Rômulo Fialdini

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Hidden House by Standard, Los Angeles, USA

“We’re thrilled with the way the house evolved,” adds Standard Principal and Co-Founder Silvia Kuhle. “Hidden House offers the ultimate country living experience in the middle of an urban environment.”

Los Angeles firm Standard has recently won the Single Family Housing category at the 40th Annual Los Angeles Architectural Awards with their project “Hidden House”.

Hidden House is located on a serene 7-acre site (in Glassell Park where the paved road ends at an old hand written sign marking the entrance to “Hidden Valley.”) The property, which can only be accessed via a half-mile unpaved road, offers expansive views of the city but seems a world away from Los Angeles at the same time.

Anticipating city restrictions associated with building on a site far removed from the street, Standard opted to keep the structure of the existing two-bedroom house substantially intact. At the same time the architects designed an entirely new home around the original space.

Today, the original two-bedroom cottage is incorporated into the house as the living and dining room. Standard added a new kitchen, family room, office, garage, master bedroom suite and kids bedroom, essentially doubling the volume of the house from 1580 sf to 3500 sf. The new house is arranged around two main courtyards. The main living spaces open up onto the interior courtyard, while the exterior courtyard looks out over the city in the distance. The self-contained cubes are arranged around the original footprint in such a way that they make order of the disorder. At a later date, the family may add on additional bedrooms per their original plan.

Hidden House also features several sustainable materials and features, ranging from the redwood cladding, to reclaimed endgrain block wood, to the cork flooring in the office, and highly efficient appliances/equipment. The design allows for excellent cross ventilation and day lighting, reducing the need to run forced-air conditioning or heat or energy-consuming electrical lighting. The house is insulated with sustainable cotton and built to be solar-ready. The garden is planted with native landscape and vegetables.

Photographs by Benny Chan

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Mountains and Opening House by EASTERN Design Office, Takarazuka, Japan

The lower floor fully utilizes the slope of the mountain. The hidden areas become mountains、while the areas that is required light become valleys. These rolling undulations are all part of the design.

Japanese architects of EASTERN Design Office completed a studio supported above the residence on two mounds of crushed marble.

The project is located in Takarazuka city and is a home and studio for a footwear designer. The living areas are on the lower floor, sheltered on three sides by the earth of the sloping site.

The outside (exterior) mountain is formed into a mound by piling up soil excavated from the slope. The surface of the mound is a type of raw material made from crushed marble called “Kansui”. Glittering fragments of crushed marble on a whity surface shine brilliantly. There are two white mountains. The living quarters are inside the white mountain while atop the white mountainous wave is a deck.

One of the two white mountains functions as a structural support for this building, while the other mountain conceals the bathroom. These two mountains are also set into the living spaces of the residential quarters. More info via dezeen..

Photographs are made by Koichi Torimura.
Via Dezeen

Other projects of EASTERN Design Office on ArchiDE:

+ Slit House by Eastern Design Office, Shiga, Japan

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House VVDB by dmvA, Mechelen, Belgium

Belgium Architects dmvA completed this interior for a post-modern pyramid house in Mechelen, Belgium.

VVDB house was mentioned as a statement for the eighties, since it has the main characteristics of eighties period building in Flanders, Belgium. The characteristics can be seen from the roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone, and many-colored aluminum joinery.

In the eighties architect Jan Van Den Berghe built his own house on a marvellous spot, close to the channel Mechelen-Brussels. Roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone and many-coloured aluminium joinery, were the main characteristics of this period building periode in Flanders.

The post-modern pyramid house was a statement for the seventies/eighties. Architect Van den Berghe requested dmvA to refurbish his own house for his daughter. No spectacular alterations, but subtle interventions, round perforations through the floors, a new central spiral stair, ‘whitening’ of the floors. Altogether an architectural attitude based on respect!

More info and pictures on Archdaily!
Pictures by Frederik Vercruysse

Other articles of DMVA on ArchiDE:
+ Blob vB3 by DMVA
+ House S by dmvA Architecten, Mechelen, Belgium

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