Facebook Headquarters by Studio O+A, Palo Alto, California.

facebookheadquarters01San Fransisco designers Studio O+A have designed the new headquarters for social networking website Facebook in Palo Alto, California. The headquarters are located in a former laboratory that was constructed in the 1960’s, the offices houses over 700 employees. As you can see on the pictures, the designers re-used as many of the former lab and equipment for the new offices as can.

facebookheadquarters02

Some info from the architects:

Employees of Facebook recently moved to a new headquarters that facilitates interaction and connection, reflecting the company’s mission as a social networking website provider.
facebookheadquarters03

Formerly a laboratory facility for high-tech manufacturer Agilent Technologies, the 150,000-square-foot structure at Palo Alto’s Stanford Research Park brings together more than 700 employees originally scattered throughout 10 locations in and around downtown Palo Alto.
facebookheadquarters04

facebookheadquarters05 The design of the space relied heavily on input from the users, appropriate for a flatly structured company that weights every employee’s opinion equally. O+A designers interviewed employees about what they wanted from their new headquarters. facebookheadquarters06

The Facebook platform was used to conduct company-wide polls about design decisions, post construction photos and updates, and keep everyone informed of the thought process behind the project. An advisory board of employees from every department collaborated with the design team on the design process, from space planning to finishes to final move coordination.facebookheadquarters06

Because the new facility houses employees coming from various locations, the company wanted to maintain each division’s distinct identity. The design takes its inspiration from the patchwork nature of Facebook users and employees, bringing together seemingly disparate elements to form a cohesive pattern and using color and interior spacing to create neighborhoods within the open plan space.facebookheadquarters07

The company’s executives sit in central areas, accessible to all employees. Large lounges and open spaces provide venues for the community to come together.  A kitchen and café continue Facebook’s tradition of providing gourmet meals to staff at all hours, while drinks and snacks are available at micro-kitchens throughout the headquarters.
facebookheadquarters08 Reflecting employees’ desire for a green headquarters, the facility is the first commercial project completed under Palo Alto’s 2008 Green Building Ordinance, making extensive use of existing architectural features, recycling millwork from the original lab, and repurposing industrial components for post-industrial use.facebookheadquarters09

facebookheadquarters10

Other sustainable features include high recycled-content carpet and energy-efficient lighting. The design goal for the new facility was to maintain the history and raw aesthetic of the building and create a fun dynamic appropriate for the company’s youthful staff.Many walls and spaces are left unfinished: employees are encouraged to write on the walls, add artwork, and move furniture as needed, allowing the building to evolve continuously.facebookheadquarters11

A bright orange industrial crane, left over from the building’s previous user, was repurposed by San Francisco sculptor Oliver DiCicco to support a table surface from its heavyweight hoist, offering maximum maneuverability. Referencing the industrial aesthetic of the building, a felt canopy spreads up one wall and onto the ceiling, defining a central meeting area that can double as an impromptu auditorium.facebookheadquarters12

facebookheadquarters13

facebookheadquarters14

Photos and info from Studio O+A

VISIT STUDIO O+A

archiDE is now on Facebook!

facebook_pic

It took a while, but here he is!  ArchiDE is now on Facebook!  You can be a fan if you like. Currently without much information, but this will change soon!

 

CLICK HERE TO BECOME A FAN

I don’t need sex – the school of architecture fucks me all the time

If you are architecture students you’ve probably experienced:

– the taste of wood glue

– changes in your vocabulary: homework to project, ball to sphere, etc

– you don’t understand how somebody can spend less than $20 at the supplies store

– you hate people telling you “go to sleep” or “do you still have a lot of work?”

– your friends and you don’t have the same concept of work “oh, well do it right before class”

– you’ve slept more than 20 straight hours on weekends

– you can easily discuss with authority the effects of caffeine on different drinks

– no matter the effort you put in a project, somebody will always say ‘why don’t you add this’? or “why don’t you change this here? or “i think that…but…yeah, its ok”?

– you’ve heard all your ipod songs in a week

– you aren’t seen in public without bags under your eyes

– whenever you get invited somewhere, it is followed by or do you have a lot of homework?

– you’ll dance ymca with a choreography without a drop of alcohol in your system

– you write down a quick message with rapidographs, lead holders, markers and ink

– you constantly make up excuses for courses that are not design related why you didn’t do your work

– you have more pictures of landscapes and places than of people

– your worst nightmare consists of not finishing a project

– someone once called you lazy? and you wanted them murdered

– you can live without human contact, sunlight, food, but if your plotter’s ink runs out… chaos!!!

– when somebody lends you a Bic pen you look down at it

– you don’t care about sports cars, your favorite car is the one where you can put in your model and your huge computer

– you design spectacular things without the idea of the cost

– you have the modern mark: a blister in your palm’s hand for the constant use of your mouse

– everybody tells you how they admire your work, “but there is no money for it?

– you’ve gained the ability to sleep in whatever surface: pencils, keyboards, backpacks, your studio mates, food, etc

– you always have the idea that your project will always be recognized

– when you finally have free time to go out you keep thinking “who was the idiot that designed the restaurant’s bathroom? “who designed this menu? or “who designed this [chair, table, lighting, fork, etc]?

– you’ve been at many sunrises, yet you’ve never seen one

– you need to read all this in a facebook group to realize how weird your life is

Blog op WordPress.com.