Burgundy wine bar and restaurant by PSLAB Beirut, Lebanon.

Lebanon-based design firm .PSLAB beirut recently has completed the Burgundy wine bar and restaurant in Beirut, Lebanon.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections. Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Via plusmood

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Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan.

01Japanese architects Suppose Architects have completed a clinic in Kure city, Hirosihima, Japan.

“Instead of keeping places normally used for movement such as an elevator shaft or stair wells closed, we wanted to open them up to collect light, using them as lightwells to maintain the lighting coming in from above. As light travels downward through the lightwells, exterior ‘bar graph’ like apertures maintain lighting on the lower levels, and gradually decrease in number towards the upper levels. This lighting design, using the building’s positive-negative relationship between interior and exterior, makes uniform lighting on each floor possible.”

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Furthermore, much like a traditional Japanese lattice door, the placement of the structurally integral- walls and apertures makes the inside of the building difficult to see from the outside, while preserving- a clear view of the outside from within, allowing for both functionality and an ideal level of privacy on- each floor.

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By reconsidering the already in place elements of the construction,such as shape,hallways and stairwells, and lighting,we think we have created a new and highly functional standard for clinics, not through a- large operation but a very modest one. 03

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More project off Suppose Design Office on archiDE:

House in Nagoya by SDO, click here
– House in Sakuragawa by SDO,
click here
– Nature Factory by SDO
, click here
– House in Nagoya2 by SDO,
click here

Via Archdaily

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Sports and Leisure Center in Saint-Cloud by KOZ Architectes

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Via Archinect, I’ve found these pictures of a Sport and Leisore center in Saint- Cload, France by French architects KOZ. The building contrast strongly with the urban development zone in which the center is located, behind a new block of apartments and some neo- Haussmannian offices.

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It is with the facing 1930s infant school that it empathises, extending the metaphor of the balcony courtyard, the passageways, the brick colour and the forecourt. As for the 1970s infant school next door, it maintains an obvious affnity with it in terms of shapes, only to dynamite the whole lot.

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All in all it’s an odd little castle and cubist mountain, that owes its existence to the boldness of the Saint-Cloud Town Council, which has thereby acquired facilities that have revitalised its image and opened it to the most contemporary and positive architectural thinking.

The spaces are superimposed without being separated. They communicate via visual glimpses: you see each other on all sides, you ‘feel’ each other, you can easily fnd your bearings in a building with a spatially fuid but unfamiliar layout. Nevertheless, the functional and administrative autonomy of the two activities (separate entrances and different operational timetables) is respected.

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The building uses colour very openly and assertively, with a wide palette ranging from red to green, by way of yellow, pink and orange. These colours cover the façade in wide stripes. Inside, the same colours are systematically repeated, like stepping in an oversized graffti. A colour coding that helps you locate from the outside the areas created on the inside. A means of spatial orientation for young children. An echo to street culture codes for those who crawl on what is dubbed the coolest indoor climbing wall in France,or practice on the pop fencing rows below!

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Architect: KOZ architectes
Location: Saint-Cloud, France
Image Credits: Stephan Lucas

Click here for more information!

Photos by Stephan Lucas!

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Mainz Markthäuser by Massimiliano & Doriana Fuksas, Mainz, Germany

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Massimiliano Fuksas Architects, completed a building complex in the middle of the city center of Mainz in Germany. Enjoy the pictures, made by Moreno Maggi.

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Text and pictures are from Massimiliano Fuksas Architects:

The building complex is located in the middle of the city center of Mainz, Germany. Its existing “historical” facade shown to the Cathedral in Mainz and its new facade to the Rebstockplatz compose the entrances to a halfclosed inner courtyard, a weather-protected “Piazzetta”. This was designed as a half-open, spatially graduated free space, which extends from the underground level over the ground level and the third level, including terraces and access level for the offices and residences, up to the glass roof.

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The “Piazzetta“ becomes a place of communication between the individual functions of the building. This connection is strengthened by the verticality of the white steles, shaped sculptures which direct the view of the visitor upward and creates a visible connection between the levels.

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All Areas in the ground floor including trade and service are accessible for pedestrians from the atrium space as well as from the streets. An escalator in the atrium brings you into the underground level with its shops. Residences and offices, if not attached directly to the stairways are accessible through indoor pergolas resp. through daylight provided hallways.

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The new facades are pulled tensionful over the entire building complex equally as an item of clothing over a human body.

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11More pictures, click here!

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Taets Art and Conference Center by 123DV Architects, Zaandam, Netherlands

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Rotterdam-based 123DV Architectuur & Consult BV transformed a former ammunition factory into a conference room and art gallery at the Taets Artgallery in Zaandam, Netherlands

While the exterior of the building was kept as it was, the new art and conference roomin the renovated factory, has a stunning interior. Just check out the contrast between the inside and outside.

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The oval conference room in the center of the open space draws the most attention by its form and the effect of light on the copper-clad walls. By sing LED lights on the wall,the rooms have visually different features from its heritage look.

02Some text from the architect:

The main challenge of the project was: How can the spirit of the existing monumental building and former ammunition factory become the outstanding feature of the new conference centre?

In the interior we analyzed 2 monumental features which define the interior space:

1 The gabled roof.
It’s elegance of the metal structure and the craftsmanship of the wooden ceiling.
In order to have maximal impact of the roof landscape the new rooms are kept free from the existing monumental roof. In contrast with the roof, the new walls are treated as abstract white boxes. They are also visually kept free from the floor through the use of Led light.

2 The windows.
Classical window composition through slender metal frames.
The existing monumental slender metal windows are framed in a wooden frame to emphasize the classical appearance. The frame houses all installations such as heating, airco, wooden blinds

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Photos by Christian Richters

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Burnham Pavilion by Zaha Hadid Architects, Chicago

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Here aresome new pictures of Zaha Hadid Architects Burnham Pavilion, which opened recently in the Millennium Park in Chicago.

Hadid’s pavilion is one of two designs that are commissioned to celebrate the centenary of the Burnham Plan, which set out a blueprint for urban design in the city.

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The pavilion is composed of an intricate bent-aluminum structure, with each element shaped and welded in order to create its unique curvilinear form. Outer and inner fabric skins are wrapped tightly around the metal frame to create the fluid shape. The skins also serve as the screen for video installations to take place within the pavilion.

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Zaha Hadid Architects’ pavilion also works within the larger framework of the Centennial celebrations’ commitment to deliberate the future of cities. The presence of the new structure triggers the visitor’s intellectual curiosity whilst an intensifi cation of public life around and within the pavilion supports the idea of public discourse. The pavilion was designed and built to maximize the recycling and re-use of the materials after its role in Millennium Park. It can be re-installed for future use at another site.

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Zaha Hadid Architects’ pavilion design for Chicago’s Burnham Plan Centennial celebrates the city’s ongoing tradition of bold plans and big dreams. The project encourages reinvention and improvement on an urban scale and welcomes the future with innovative ideas and technologies whilst referencing the original organizational systems of Burnham’s plan.

Our design continues Chicago’s renowned tradition of cutting edge architecture and engineering, at the scale of a temporary pavilion. The design merges new formal concepts with the memory of bold historic urban planning. Superimpositions of spatial structures with hidden traces of Burnham’s organizational systems and architectural representations create unexpected results. By using methods of overlaying, complexity is build up and inscribed in the structure.

See ArchiDE’s other story about the Burnham Pavilion, designed by UNStudio.

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Images courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects © Michelle Litvin.

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The Melbourne Recital Centre by ARM, Melbourne, Australia

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Ashton Raggatt McDougal (ARM) architects designed the Melbourne Recital Centre and the neighbouring Melbourne Theatre Company helping to transform the formerly derelict Southbank area of the city in to the dynamic district it has now become. Formely they got honoured with the 2009 Victorian Architecture Medal winning highest accolades in three categories for public architecture, interior design as well as urban design.

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The entrance begins with the dramatic facade in 3D iridescent steel tubing folds that bends against black aluminium. The interior, is a 500-seat hall noticeably without a balcony or mezzanine space, but still allowing exceptional site lines to the stage regardless.

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The most striking element that you can find inside, is the World Wall in the main theatre where 70 quotes from different plays are illuminated when the stage is dark. The building also houses a full rehearsal hall that can be used as an event space or a smaller performance space, as well as a café and bar at the front of the house.

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Short news text about the award:

The recital centre and MTC buildings by ARM and the urban transformation of their formerly neglected Southbank site are honored with the 2009 Victorian Architecture Medal for successfully crossing design boundaries and taking out the top awards in three categories: the William Wardell Award for public architecture; th

e Marion Mahony Award for interior architecture and the Joseph Reed Award for urban design.

Chair of juries, Philip Goad, says the combined buildings make a significant contribution to Melbourne’s arts precinct and may well expand current audiences, sentiments echoed in the Victorian Medal jury citation.

“The robust sculptural facades have already become iconic and the changes to traffic and pedestrian patterns at an urban level have transformed the area into an active domain,” praised the jury.

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Photos by John Gollings

Via Bustler

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JS Bach Chamber Music Hall by Zaha Hadid Architects, Manchester

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A few weeks ago, Zaha Hadid Architects have built an installation at Manchester Art Gallery to house the performances of music by Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

The structure, a translucent, fabric membrane stretched over a steel structure suspended from the ceiling divides and encloses the space, creating a stage, enclosure for the audience and passages into and out of the auditorium. The installation is designed for the Manchester International Festival, the venue hosts a series of concerts which started last Friday and continue until 18 July. Concert details are on the MIF website.

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The following is from Zaha Hadid Architects:

A voluminous ribbon swirls within the room, carving out a spatial and visual response to the intricate relationships of Bach’s harmonies. As the ribbon careens above the performer, cascades into the ground and wraps around the audience, the original room as a box is sculpted into fluid spaces swelling, merging, and slipping through one another.

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“The design enhances the multiplicity of Bach’s work through a coherent integration of formal and structural logic. A single continuous ribbon of fabric swirls around itself, creating layered spaces to cocoon the performers and audience with in an intimate fluid space.” said Hadid.

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The process of realizing the design involved architectural considerations of scale, structure and acoustics to develop a dynamic formal dialogue inseparable from its intended purpose as an intimate chamber music hall.

A layering of spaces and functions is achieved through the ribbon wrapping around itself, alternately compressing to the size of a handrail then stretching to enclose the full height of the room. Circulatory and visual connections are continually discovered as one passes through the multiple layers of space delineated by the ribbon. The ribbon itself consists of a translucent fabric membrane articulated by an internal steel structure suspended from the ceiling. The surface of the fabric shell undulates in a constant but changing rhythm as it is stretched over the internal structure.

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It varies between the highly tensioned skin on the exterior of the ribbon and the soft billowing effect of the same fabric on the interior of the ribbon. Clear acrylic acoustic panels are suspended above the stage to reflect and disperse the sound, while remaining visually imperceptible within the fabric membrane.

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Images courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects, © Luke Hayes.

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Burnham Pavilion by UNStudio, Chigago

01Recently the Dutch architects UNStudio completed the Burnham pavilion in Millennium Park, Chicago. The temorary pavilion opened last month and will remain in place until 31 October 2009, so be quick! The pavilion is build to celebrate the centenary of 1909 Plan of Chicago, also known as the Burnham Plan.

“The UNStudio Burnham Pavilion relates to diverse city contexts, program and scales. It invites people to gather, walk around and through and to explore and observe. The pavilion is sculptural, highly accessible and functions as an urban activator.” -Ben van Berkel

07Some news from UNStudio:

UNStudio’s Burnham pavilion, commissioned for the centennial celebrations of the Plan of Chicago by Daniel H. Burnham and Edward H. Bennett, opened to the public on June 19th.


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The pavilion, commissioned by the privately funded Burnham Plan Centennial Committee, draws ideas about opening Chicago’s rectangular grid from the Burnham Plan and offers windows onto Chicago skyline. Hidden beneath the sculptural form is a steel substructure made of material generously donated by ArcelorMittal.
The structure is designed to be deconstructed to maximize the recycling and re-use of the materials following the free exhibit’s closing later this year.(source unstudio.com)


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Za-Koenji Public Theatre by Toyo Ito, Tokyo, Japan

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Recently I saw some  impressive pictures of the Za Koenji Public Theatre on dezeen which I wanted to share with you!

The building is a contemporary performing arts theatre that produces, presents and supports music, dance, drama and storyteling in the Suginami area of Tokyo, designed by the Japanese architect  Toyo Ito.

Via Dezeen!

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06Photos by Iwan Baan

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