Eva Fashion Store by Volido, New York

The combination of the spatial-anorexia, emphasized with the narrowness of the perspective, and the transparency of the full operable clear panel glass facade, swallow the eyes of the passerby.

New York studio Volido have completed the interiors for a fashion store in New York that’s intended to look like a fashion runway. Called Eva Fashion Store, the store claims to be the most exclusive home for emerging international fashion designers in New York.

Project description by Volido:

Once upon a time, in an old Chinese Grocery store in the lower Manhattan, Max Sanjulian, principal of Volido, designed what claims to be the most exclusive home for emerging international fashion designers in New York. Viviane Westwood Anglomania, Henrik Vibskov, C.Neon and TV among others in its racks… the space is EVA.

Volido, running away from the traditional approach to fashion-retail space, choose Fast, Cheap and Smart as positive qualities inherent to the best contemporary designs. With the Fashion Industry, highly monopolized by corporates, this attitude seems to be the way to go in order to survive independently in places like Manhattan, Tokyo, London or Paris.

The Fluorescent tube-lit hybrid space is now conceived to combine fashion sales, temporary art exhibits and events in a very long and narrow lot. Economy of movements with long and straight lines are framing the clothing and articulating the indoor seating areas at the same time.

The combination of the spatial-anorexia, emphasized with the narrowness of the perspective, and the transparency of the full operable clear panel glass facade, swallow the eyes of the passerby. The store front emphasizes this effect with the dissolution of the limits between interior and exterior offering an outdoor-indoor-seating-stage area that has already become a hang out point for the regular downtown fashionistas.

More info, click here

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Salt Museum by Malcotti Roussey Architectes + Thierry Gheza, France

Use of steel is a reference to the other building, overlooking the river and built to contain a casino, restaurant and auditorium on the site of another old salt works which was destroyed in the Second World War.

Malcotti Roussey Architectes + Thierry Gheza completed this museum in the French city Salins-les-Bain.

Closed since 1962, the salt works in Salins-les-Bain have been an important productive site since the middle ages right in the centre of the French city in the Franche Comté. When the competition for restoration of the salt works was announced in 2006, the city authorities had already set the goal of transforming it into a monument to the history of local production with the aim of restoring its original central importance, not only symbolically but in the city’s urban layout: recently made a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the site is intended not so much as a museum of salt but an open-air museum of local history. This is why Malcotti-Roussey and Gheza’s project indissolubly links the goal of protecting the salt warehouses with the goal of revealing their symbolic importance for the city, which translates into a restoration to preserve the complex’s original architecture with declared modern additions. More information, click here

Via Archdaily

ARCHDAILY

Double 00 09 Boutique by Koichi Futatsumata /CASE-REAL, Fukuoka, Japan

“One big curve expands obliquely into the inside considering the view from a street in front and the movement line and another gentle curve of the ceiling links in three dimensions.”

Koichi Futatsumata of CASE REAL designed this boutique that is located in Fukuoka, Japan. The store was designed for the Japanse retailer Alohanine and features a very minimalist and clean interior.

First, I analyzed the given environment (the arrangement of the construction to the front street and the site). Then, I thought that the space construction should be intelligent, mysterious and deep to lead the movement lines into the store, with a glance of people who pass the street would be naturally drawn to the store. Therefore, I used these two curves together, one is the wall curve expanding from the outside and the other one is the ceiling curve like a cave. Then I studied deliberately how to tie and organize these shapes.

Via furfin+ minimalismi

Photography by Hiroshi Mizusaki

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Carysfort Road residence by ODOS architects, Dalkey, Ireland

A beautiful execution of balance, function and comfort shapes the extension into a beautiful retreat from work.

This mid-terrace house in Ireland has been extensively refurbished into a contemporary live/work space by ODOS Architects. The new structure was conceived as a simple form which connects at ground level with the existing house.

The tight site and strict planning constraints defined the form of the new extension from an early stage. In order to stop the new addition being visible above the roof line of the house, the new extension is partially sunken.

The ground floor rear elevation is completely open to provide a full height glazed connection to the courtyard.

Above this new living space is an office mezzanine with a glazed south-facing wall, providing clerestory lighting to the ground floor. Black terrazzo flooring has been used throughout, which contrasts with the white walls and ceilings.

Old situation:

Other projects of ODOS Architects on Archide:
+
Ballymahon Farmhouse by ODOS Architects, Ireland

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Museo del Agua by MID Estudio, Palencia, Spain

“Boxes” hanging from the skylight go down to light up exclusively the sheet of water achieving a more tenuous and quiet space.

Spanish architects MID Estudio have converted a old grain store in Palencia, Spain, into a museum by blocking up windows and door with metallic and wood boxes on the roof and facade. Called Museo del Agua (Museum of Water), the building has been renovated to house a reception area, and temporary and permanent exhibition spaces.

The creation of the Museum of Water has made it possible to refurbish one of the stores in the dock. The building has a rectangular floor measuring 62,4×10,3m, concrete load-bearing walls with a brick sheet on the outer side and a repetitive rhythm both of doors and windows. Wooden trusses with metallic straps form the roof´s structure.

The proposal links the abstract content of the museum to the neutral continent by means of architectural language. A skylight which goes along the ridge of the roof gives sense to the different spaces of the museum bringing and qualifying light into each of them and providing the building of meaning. The skylight is superposed to the pre-existing structure but does not alter it and gets accommodated to its rigorous modulation. That way, both structures, the new one and the old one, complement each other. “Boxes” pending from the skylight bring light inside.

The program is divided in three areas: a reception area with administration and services, a temporary exhibition area and the permanent exhibition area. The building is long and narrow so it establishes a sequential route along the spaces where the visitor always discovers them in the same order.

After the access and the reception there is an exempt piece covered in glass so that it dematerializes with a game of reflections. It holds the administration, facilities, toilets and a small store. The visitor should walk around it to access the exhibition area of the museum. The light from the skylight reflects on its cover.

The space for temporary exhibitions is diaphanous and versatile and multiple activities such as exhibitions, conferences, etc can be held on it. The light coming from the skylight, changing throughout the day and the seasons, enters freely through it.

A sheet of water starts at the end of the temporary exhibition area and crosses the permanent exhibition space, situated at the end of the route, compelling the visitor to surround it. “Boxes” hanging from the skylight go down to light up exclusively the sheet of water achieving a more tenuous and quiet space.

At the same time, the permanent exhibition which will be carried out via interactive audiovisuals will be projected onto those boxes´ surface. The tangible presence of the water moving and the sound that it generates are part of the sensory experience of the museum.

Doors and windows of the existing building are now occupied by metallic and wooden devices. They are designed, like the skylight on the roof is, to drive and filter the light or to direct the visitor´s gaze to the water surface of the dock, as well as to create small spaces which now have the shape of peculiar bow windows where people on a visit can take a break.

Photographs are by Helena Velez Olabarria.
Via Dezeen

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Ella Dining Room and Bar by UXUS Design, California, USA

With the principles of “Rustic Luxury” in mind, UXUS designed a dining space that celebrates the essential beauty and goodness contained in simple things, a principle that is similarly reflected in Ella’s menu, which promotes local growers, seasonal ingredients and pure, simple dishes.

UXUS created a unique dining concept for Ella,  located in California’s State Capital, Sacramento, that embodies the principles of Rustic Luxury.

The Selzim Restaurant Group commissioned UXUS to create a world class environment for their new restaurant, Ella Dining Room & Bar, located in the heart of Sacramento California, two blocks away from the State Capitol Building. The restaurant is named after the granddaughter of executive Chef Randell Selland, of the Kitchen Restaurant and Selland’s Market-Café.

The 4 million dollar project has a capacity for 250 diners and serves “Modern American Bistro” cuisine. The owners wanted the restaurant to become “Sacramento’s living room,” an urban oasis where lawmakers and other diners can go and unwind after a long day’s work.

With the principles of “Rustic Luxury” in mind, UXUS designed a dining space that celebrates the essential beauty and goodness contained in simple things, a principle that is similarly reflected in Ella’s menu, which promotes local growers, seasonal ingredients and pure, simple dishes. “Rustic Luxury” synchronizes simplicity and complexity, the traditional and the contemporary, to define an elegant, relaxed lifestyle and the pleasure and sensuality of real materials.

In keeping with these principles, UXUS beautifully intertwines the old and the new. 500 salvaged antique Hungarian shutters line the walls and ceiling, enveloping diners in rustic textures and colors, whilst billowing white curtains punctuate and soften the space. Plush, luxurious ottomans and a light, contemporary palette balance reclaimed wood stools and traditional country tables. Simple white pendants dramatically sweep through the space; their gold interior complementing the custom LED gilded steel discs on the wall. More..

Via Archdaily
Photographs by Mathijs Wessing

Other projects of UXUS on Archide:
+ UXUS to design retail shops in Tate Modern, London, UK
+ Heineken Lounge Bar by UXUS Designers

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Fiat Lux by Label Architecture, Brussels, Belgium

Transparency, reflections and connections between the different levels determine the daily routine of the large family living in.

Brussels studio Label Architecture have transformed the interior of a family house in Brussels, Belgium, by covering some walls in rough, black-stained osb and painting others white.

It consists in the transformation of a 270 m² family house. A punctual intervention, centred on the heart of a traditional house in Brussels, gave to this dwelling an outstanding character. Transparency, reflections and connections between the different levels determine the daily routine of the large family living in. From the first floor, the stairwell was entirely emptied on the three higher-ups levels.

A staircase in openworked metal links together the two first floors. At each level, glazed windows were handled with care, on all the height of the dividing wall, bringing a real physical feeling, not so far from vertigo. Some of them are pierced by little round openings, allowing inhabitant to communicate from a level to another one.

Behind the windowpanes, the platforms, transitions spaces, were covered by OSB stain in black, creating a mirror effect to those who look at them from the opposite openings. In front of this openings, mirrors were installed on the blind attached wall. The family benefits the unexpected connections of this surprising arrangement, worthy of Lewis Caroll.

*Label architecture is an architectural practice based in Brussels, Belgium. Its three partners, Jean-Didier Bergilez (1974), Michel Lefèvre (1978) and Thibaut Rome (1977) opened their agency in October 2004. Their projects, on various scales, are as much an opportunity to play with existing space, from their common reference points, as not to take themselves too seriously while being serious about their work.

Via furfin
Photographs are made by
Bepictures

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Sukiya House by Yukiharu Suzuki, Shizuoka Japan

Yukiharu Suzuki designed this residence located in Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka, Japan. The open plan 3-story wood frame and concrete house has an underground balcony with an amazing view. Enjoy the pictures.
Via  Whatwedoissecret

Via Whatwedoissecret

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House in Obama by Suppose Design Office, Fukui, Japan

The unique design of the house is inside courtyards. The gardens are placed between the rooms and separate each room.

This house designed by Japanese studio Suppose Design Office in the grounds of a clinic is raised above the car park on piloti. Located in Obama city in Fukui, Japan, the house is divided internally by courtyards between each room. Other projects of Suppose Design Office, see below.

House in Obama is for a family of a president of a company that is located at the opposite side of a road. The site is near the beach, and it has some climatic problems such as damaging from sea breeze. Because of the site condition, the client wanted their residence space closed to the outside environment. The building has piloti because of keeping some space for cars as it was used as a parking lot.

Although skinny steel structure was considered for the piloti, it was designed as Reinforced concrete structure to create more friendly environment for old patients who are high rates for the clinic. The structure answers both conditions to have closed residential space and open parking area.

The construction at the second floor is metal structure that can be a wide span because of the exterior walls as it was designed for truss beams.

Kitchen space, bathrooms, study corners, storage and so on are placed at the boarder line of the building area. Other rooms used as main space of a residence, such as living space, bed room, kids rooms are located inner area to protect from cold air from outside.

The unique design of the house is inside courtyards. The gardens are placed between the rooms and separate each room.

The walls at the courtyards are glass-framed walls, and they create one continuous space of the house, especially when they are opened and connect all space. Because of the courtyards, elements of the rooms and gardens are mixed and interact each other to create space that is hard to define neither inside nor outside. We believe the relationship would create more possibilities of architecture that could be more open and closer to the outside environment.

Via Dezeen

Other projects of Suppose Design Officeon ArchiDE:

+ House in the Kodaira by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Koamicho by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ House in Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Buzen House by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Lodge by Suppose Design Office, Hiroshima, Japan
+ House in Otake by Suppose Design Office, Japan
+ Clinic by Suppose Design Office, Hirosihima, Japan
+ House in Nagoya by Suppose Design Office, Aichi, Japan
+ House in Sakuragawa, Tokyo by Suppose Design Office
+ Nature Factory by Suppose Design Office, Tokyo, Japan
+ House in Nagoya2 by Suppose Design office, Japan

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SMOG office by Sebastián Bravo, Santiago

The resulting design embraces its industrial origin, providing a flexible setup that fully reflects the way the team collaborate, allowing informal congregation and mobility.

Sebastián Bravo recently completed this office for a motion graphics studio SMOG. The office is located on the top floor of a building formerly occupied by textile workshops, in the Patronato area of Santiago.

Before

With ‘La Vega’, the city’s main produce market at its heart, and generations of Chinese, Korean and Middle Eastern immigrants thriving in the textile business and marketing products from their own countries, Patronato is known for its funky little stores and street vendors. Not your typical location for an office in Santiago.

With an open, bright, empty space in mind, this former workshop seemed like the perfect choice for the client —a motion graphics studio.

The strategy was to locate the only private part of the studio —an enclosed conference room— in the center of the space. Reception, dining area, bathroom, kitchen and a large work area would revolve around it.

A rather tight budget kept materials and solutions as simple as they could possibly be. With that in mind, flooring, walls and windows were kept as they were. The suspended ceiling was stripped away to reveal the original timber and metal structure.

Old electrical wiring was replaced by an exposed installation on trays rising 3m above the floor. Raw construction materials —as opposed to more sophisticated solutions— were used as finishings. Fiber cement boards line the interior of the meeting space and painted plywood serves as flooring.

Via Archdaily!
Photographs by Martin Bravo

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