Brandbase Pallets by Most Architecture, Amsterdam, Netherland Brandbase Pallet Project / MOST Architecture

Dutch firm Most Architecture have created this temporary office from wooden pallets for an Amsterdam advertising company.

The project for advertising agency BrandBase sits in a narrow Dutch canal house that runs 27 metres deep.
The pallet structure is designed in such a way that besides being merely a workplace, the entire element invites you to stand, sit or lay down on the pallets. This open office concept was created to suit the creative advertising agency, with an additional, informal atmosphere.

Find the pallet project on FACEBOOK!

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Cargo offices by Group8 and Dynamobel, Switzerland

This eclectic interior architecture of an office building was recently realised by the studio Group8 – project team Christophe Pidoux, Christian Giussoni, Richard Fulop and Marco Neri. The customer is the logistic company Cargo.

The aim was to provide some silent work and conference spaces within the otherwise wide and busy open-plan office. The architects designed very simple space painted in white into which old and disused cargo containers were stacked one upon the other. They are of different colour and so they are in contrast with the white space. This way small offices were created inside the containers painted in white. The concept was developed in collaboration with the Spanish office furniture manufacturer Dynamobel.

Via MAD
Photographes are made by Régis Golay, FEDERAL studio

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Burgundy wine bar and restaurant by PSLAB Beirut, Lebanon.

Lebanon-based design firm .PSLAB beirut recently has completed the Burgundy wine bar and restaurant in Beirut, Lebanon.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections. Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Via plusmood

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PISOPISO by Atelier RYO ABE, Kashiwa , Chiba, Japan

Architects Atelier RYO ABE completed this interior for a private house in Kashiwa , Chiba, Japan. Pictures via Aberyo.

Other projects of Ryo ABE, click here

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Eva Fashion Store by Volido, New York

The combination of the spatial-anorexia, emphasized with the narrowness of the perspective, and the transparency of the full operable clear panel glass facade, swallow the eyes of the passerby.

New York studio Volido have completed the interiors for a fashion store in New York that’s intended to look like a fashion runway. Called Eva Fashion Store, the store claims to be the most exclusive home for emerging international fashion designers in New York.

Project description by Volido:

Once upon a time, in an old Chinese Grocery store in the lower Manhattan, Max Sanjulian, principal of Volido, designed what claims to be the most exclusive home for emerging international fashion designers in New York. Viviane Westwood Anglomania, Henrik Vibskov, C.Neon and TV among others in its racks… the space is EVA.

Volido, running away from the traditional approach to fashion-retail space, choose Fast, Cheap and Smart as positive qualities inherent to the best contemporary designs. With the Fashion Industry, highly monopolized by corporates, this attitude seems to be the way to go in order to survive independently in places like Manhattan, Tokyo, London or Paris.

The Fluorescent tube-lit hybrid space is now conceived to combine fashion sales, temporary art exhibits and events in a very long and narrow lot. Economy of movements with long and straight lines are framing the clothing and articulating the indoor seating areas at the same time.

The combination of the spatial-anorexia, emphasized with the narrowness of the perspective, and the transparency of the full operable clear panel glass facade, swallow the eyes of the passerby. The store front emphasizes this effect with the dissolution of the limits between interior and exterior offering an outdoor-indoor-seating-stage area that has already become a hang out point for the regular downtown fashionistas.

More info, click here

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EXPO 2010 DANISH PAVILION by BIG, Shanghai, China

“When we visited the World Exhibition in Zaragoza, we were stunned by the artificial content. State propaganda in paper maché. The Danish Expo pavilion 2010 is the real deal, and not just endless talking. You can ride the city bike, take a swim in the harbor bath, and see the real Little Mermaid”, Founder of BIG, Bjarke Ingels.

Last week the Danish Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels Group at Shanghai Expo 2010 opened to the public along with the rest of the Expo.

The Danish pavilion at EXPO 2010 gives visitors the opportunity to try some of the best aspects of Danish city life themselves. Through interaction, the visitors are able to actually experience some of Copenhagen’s best attractions – the city bike, the harbor bath, playground settings, a picnic on the roof garden and the opportunity to see the authentic H.C Andersen’s Little Mermaid.

The pavilion is designed as a traffic loop created by the motion of city bikes and pedestrians tied in a knot. Over 300 free city bikes located upon the roofscape, offer the visitors a chance to experience the Danish urban lifestyle which includes biking everywhere. The loops are connected in two places. Coming from the inside, the visitors can move out onto the roof, pick up a bike and re-visit the exhibition by bike as the outdoor cycle path slips into the interior and runs along the entire exhibition before exiting onto the EXPO grounds. The sequence of events at the exhibition takes place between two parallel facades – the internal and external. The internal is closed and contains different functions of the pavilion. The width varies and is defined by the programme of the inner space. The pavilion’s external façade is made of perforated steel. In the evening time, the façade becomes a sequenced instrument of interactive light illuminating the passers-by.

The exhibition can be experienced in two speeds, as a calm stroll with time to absorb the surroundings and as a dynamic bicycle trip, where the city and city life rush past. Like a Danish city, the Danish pavilion is best experienced on foot and by bike. This way, the pavilion’s theme Welfairytales (Welfare + Fairytales) re-launches the bicycle in Shanghai as a symbol of lifestyle and sustainable urban development. When the Expo closes, the pavilion can be moved to another site in Shanghai and could function as a transfer point for Shanghai’s new city bikes.

The pavilion is a monolithic structure in white painted steel which keeps it cool during the Shanghai summer sun due to its heat-reflecting characteristics. The roof is covered with a light blue surfacing texture, known from Danish cycle paths. Inside, the floor is covered with light epoxy and also features the blue cycle path where the bikes pass through the building. The steel of the facade is perforated in a pattern that reflects the actual structural stresses that the pavilion is experiencing making it a 1:1 stress test. The blue cycle path and white concrete surfaces will further define the arrival and exit areas.

Sitting in the harbor pool at the centre of the pavilion is the real Little Mermaid from the harbor of Copenhagen. As one of three of H.C. Andersen’s fables, who is affectionally known in China as An Tung Shung, which is read by every child in China, this will be seen as a gesture of cultural generosity between Denmark and China. While the mermaid is in Shanghai her place in Copenhagen will be replaced by Ai Wei Wei’s multimedia artwork, including a live broadcast of the statue in Shanghai. Other artists include Jeppe Hein from Denmark, who designed a ’social bench’ that will run alongside the bicycle lane and adapts to its environment elastically by incorporating different functions including a bar for food and drink. The works of Martin De Thurah and Peter Funch are also included in the exhibition areas.

All photos are copyright Iwan Baan.
Special thanks to Daria Pahhota for sharing!

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Shanghai 2010: The Pavilions via Archdaily


Chaz Hutton shared some amazing photos of the pavilions in Shanghai with Archdaily!  Click here to see al the pavilions!

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St. Bartholomew’s Church by Maxim Velcovsky and Qubus Studio, Bohemia

Czech designer Maxim Velcovsky and Jakub Berbdych off Qubus Studio redesigned this interior of a church in Eastern Bohemia, using customised design classics, rugs and chandeliers.

“The latest creation of the Qubus Studio originated at the St. Bartholomew’s Church in the village of Chodovice, Eastern Bohemia. On this location, Jakub Berdych and Maxim Velcovsky have succeeded in making design an integral part of religion. Here at the St. Bartholomew’s Church you will surely notice that both designers have once again shown their typical flair for working with the context. Through integration and unexpected combination of intelligent elements, they have added a new dimension to the Baroque interior.”

Via furfin

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Blob vB3 by DMVA

Belgian architectural firm dmvA designed this mobile living unit called ‘blob VB3’.

The design dmvA made for the office of XfactorAgencies, as an extension to the house, was relentlessly rejected by local building regulations. Used to working with limitations and blurring these boundaries at the same time, dmvA answered by designing a mobile unit, a blob.

As a mobile construction and holding a high dose of art, it skirted round the strict building codes.

AD&S, as a builder, worked 18 months on this project, resulting in this smooth looking egg. This space-egg houses all necessary items one could possibly need; bathroom, kitchen, lighting, a bed and several niches to store your stuff. The nose can be opened automatically and functions as a kind of porch.

You could easily use this mobile unit as an office, a guestroom, a reception, a garden-house, or whatever you want to.

The material used is polyester, sizes are like a big caravan and it can be moved to any place you like.

Photographs by Rini van Beek, Mick Couwenbergh
Via Designinspiration

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Regent’s Place Pavilion by Carmody Groarke, London

London architects Carmody Groarke, have recently completed a pavilion in London. The Regent’s Place Pavilion was the result of a competition run by The Architecture Foundation in 2007.

The original competition brief called for a new pavilion to mark the Osnaburgh Street entrance to Regent’s Place, that enriches and activates the public open space at street level. Carmody Groarke’s winning concept for the pavilion, presents a pavilion as an open field of slender columns which supports a canopy eight metres above the landscape of the street.

Visible from Euston Road, the pavilion reveals various clustered densities of the vertical columns beneath its canopy, that shimmer in sunlight by day and contain intense projected ‘gold’ light by night, generating a visual moiré effect for passers-by. Its dramatic form is visible from approaching each end of Triton Street intensifing the experience of movement between 10 and 20 Triton Street, two newly-developed office buildings at the Western entrance to British Land’s Regent’s Place.

The pavilion’s design has been the product of a architectural / engineering collaboration between Arup and Carmody Groarke. Holding the 3mm plate stainless steel canopy aloft 8m, extremely slender vertical elements stand without any cross-bracing, joined only at the top with a decorative structural lattice. Extensive testing of prototypes was undertaken on full size mock-ups at the Building Research Establishment as part of the design development process.

The pavilion forms a lightweight counterpoint to the architecture of the public colonnades flanking each side of the street, relating architecturally to the height of these adjacent structures, but also inviting views across the street from one side to the other. The grain of the pavilion, from the form of the lozenge shaped canopy to the alignment of the columns in their surrounding green-granite cobbled landscape base, is turned 45 degrees to its context to form a dynamic relationship between the buildings and the public realm.

Amongst the field of elements, bespoke LED lighting is set into the pattern of the cobbled surface to up-light the pavilion’s canopy, providing all the ambient external lighting to this end of Regent’s Place.

The creation of this new ornamental pavilion within Regent’s Place, examines how the public space is defined without enclosing it. It is the latest addition to the collection of public artworks and installations at Regent’s Place, which already features works by Antony Gormley, Ben Langlands & Nikki Bell, Liam Gillick and Edward Hodges Baily.

Photographs are made by Luke Hayes.
Via Contemporist (click for more pictures)

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