Brandbase Pallets by Most Architecture, Amsterdam, Netherland Brandbase Pallet Project / MOST Architecture

Dutch firm Most Architecture have created this temporary office from wooden pallets for an Amsterdam advertising company.

The project for advertising agency BrandBase sits in a narrow Dutch canal house that runs 27 metres deep.
The pallet structure is designed in such a way that besides being merely a workplace, the entire element invites you to stand, sit or lay down on the pallets. This open office concept was created to suit the creative advertising agency, with an additional, informal atmosphere.

Find the pallet project on FACEBOOK!

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House on the Castle Mountainside by Fran Silvestre Arquitectos, Valencia, Spain

Fran Silvestre Arquitectos designed this amazing house that is located in Ayora, Valencia, Spain.

The building is located in a landscape of unique beauty, the result of a natural and evident growth. The mountain, topped by a castle, is covered by a blanket housing through a system of aggregation by simple juxtaposition of pieces generated fragmented target tissue that adapts to the topography.

The project proposes to integrate into the environment, respecting their strategies of adaptation to the environment and materials away from the mimesis that would lead to misleading historicism, and showing the time constructively to meet the requirements of the “new people.” In this way the house is conceived as a piece placed on the ground, joining in the gap.

A piece built on the same white lime, the same primacy of the massif on the opening, which takes the edge of the site to have their holes and integrated into the fragmentation of the environment.

Photographs by Fernando Alda

Via Muuz

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Rolex Learning Center by SANAA, Lausanne, Switzerland


Video is made by the Proudfoot Company

The Rolex Learning Center, a university and study centre is designed by the acclaimed Japanese firm  SANAA. The centre is located on the campus of science and technology university EPFL in Switzerland (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne), and is open to both students and the public.

The Rolex Learning Center will function as a laboratory for learning, a library with 500,000 volumes and an international cultural hub for EPFL, open to both students and the public. Spread over one single fluid space of 20,000 sq metres, it provides a seamless network of services, libraries, information gathering, social spaces, spaces to study, restaurants, cafes and beautiful outdoor spaces.

It is a highly innovative building, with gentle slopes and terraces, undulating around a series of internal ‘patios’, with almost invisible supports for its complex curving roof, which required completely new methods of construction.

The building is rectangular in plan, but appears to be more organic in shape because of the way that its roof and floor undulate gently, always in parallel. With few visible supports, the building touches the ground lightly, leaving an expanse of open space beneath which draws people from all sides towards a central entrance.

More information via:
+ The rolex Learning Center
+ Dezeen
+ Designboom
+ Archdaily

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House 6 by Marcio Kogan, São Paulo, Brazil

Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan has recently completed this house in São Paulo, Brazil.

The House 6 project was thought out after the client had made an important request. The family wanted a covered external space to be used for everyday living. This space should be used to organize all the social life of the house.

The Brazilian tropical climate suggests ample use of these solutions in vernacular as well as in modern architecture.  Beginning from the colonial, Brazilian architecture has usually incorporated a space that was known as the veranda. Verandas are covered linear spaces in front of the living room and bedrooms which act as the intermediary between the interior and exterior.

In the House 6 project, the idea of the veranda has been reinvented. The veranda is not exactly in front of the living room, disposed longitudinally, but, rather, perpendicular to it. The wooden pillars that give support to the structure and the clay tiles of traditional verandas have been substituted by modern pilotis that support a volume of flat slabs.

The veranda of House 6, nonetheless, still remains an open space and, simultaneously, opens to the garden and the pool. It is a living room, a TV room and an extension of the internal kitchen.

This space, then, structured the entire architecture of the house, organized in two transversal volumes and an annex in the back that holds a home office. The lower volume houses the utilities, the kitchen and the living room with door-frames that can be recessed into the walls, and thereby entirely opening the internal space to either side.  This sets the cross-ventilation and an unfettered contiguous view of the garden.

The upper volume has the private area of the house with the bedrooms and, on the third floor there is a small multiple-use living room alongside an upper deck.

Architecturally, the space of the veranda, located under the bedrooms, would have a low ceiling-height, to create a warm feeling. The sum of the structure of the two perpendicular volumes and the living room ceiling-height would result in a very high ceiling.

Thus, it was decided to make the living room lower in relation to the veranda and the garden. This result made it possible to have a house with elongated proportions and the viability of a covered external pleasant space to be used on both warm and cool days in the city of São Paulo.

Via Contemporist
Photographs are made by Rômulo Fialdini

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House VVDB by dmvA, Mechelen, Belgium

Belgium Architects dmvA completed this interior for a post-modern pyramid house in Mechelen, Belgium.

VVDB house was mentioned as a statement for the eighties, since it has the main characteristics of eighties period building in Flanders, Belgium. The characteristics can be seen from the roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone, and many-colored aluminum joinery.

In the eighties architect Jan Van Den Berghe built his own house on a marvellous spot, close to the channel Mechelen-Brussels. Roof-type, symmetrical ground plan, wooden structure, honest materials, the use of cement stone and many-coloured aluminium joinery, were the main characteristics of this period building periode in Flanders.

The post-modern pyramid house was a statement for the seventies/eighties. Architect Van den Berghe requested dmvA to refurbish his own house for his daughter. No spectacular alterations, but subtle interventions, round perforations through the floors, a new central spiral stair, ‘whitening’ of the floors. Altogether an architectural attitude based on respect!

More info and pictures on Archdaily!
Pictures by Frederik Vercruysse

Other articles of DMVA on ArchiDE:
+ Blob vB3 by DMVA
+ House S by dmvA Architecten, Mechelen, Belgium

VISIT dmvA ARCHITECTS

Earl’s Gourmet Grub by FreelandBuck, Los Angeles, USA

FreelandBuck projected Earl’s Gourmet Grub, an artisanal deli and gourmet market in Los Angeles, USA.

Architectural computation is generally promoted in relation to high-tech building systems and iconic towers. Earl’s Gourmet Grub is a test case in how computational architecture can enrich everyday use. The restaurant was designed with contemporary technology to fit an old-world sensibility inspired by its food. Torquing ceiling surfaces and inscribed digital patterns are combined with a rich material and color palette to evoke both technological refinement and the more rustic feel of alpine landscapes and Viennese cafes.

Earl’s is an artisanal deli and gourmet market that opened in May 2010 in Los Angeles. The 1000sf. tenant improvement is conceived of as an interior landscape; a variable and shifting space defined by a series of torqued ceiling surfaces and light ’scoops’. The ceiling creates an airy, light-filled canopy with local intensities modulated by wood ‘baffles’ of oscillating depth. These rhythmic undulations both subdivide the linear space into a series of spatial pockets and produce dynamic spatial continuity from front to back.

The clients, Yvonne McDonald and Dean Harada, requested a contemporary architectural identity but one that evoked the rustic or alpine qualities of the fresh ingredients used in the food. The west wall, which spans the entire depth of the space, is embossed with an image of the Alps abstracted as a series of rectangular computational ‘bits’. The result – alpine picturesque run through a computational filter – evokes neither pure landscape nor pure technology, opening up a wider range of associations.

Photography by Lawrence Anderson/Esto

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Scala Vinoteca Restaurant by Kokkinou – Kourkoulas Architects, Greece

Scala Vinoteca is a Spanish-style wine bar with over 100 bottles to choose from, paired with fresh food from recipes across the Mediterranean sea.  This fashionable restaurant was designed by Kokkinou – Kourkoulas Architects, with a focus on minimal sensibility but plenty of culture and attitude.

With a strong resemblance to Spanish vineries, they gave the place a simple character and strong attitude through the use of simple materials such as wood and aluminum. But the leading role here is for the fiberglass shell chairs by Eames.

Photos by George Fakaros

Via yatzer

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