8 House by BIG Architects, Copenhagen, Denmark


Danish architects BIG have completed their 8 House residential project with a figure-of-eight plan in Copenhagen.

The building features a continuous cycle path and pedestrian walkway, winding up to the tenth floor and back down to ground level, and providing access to all residences. The structure wraps around two courtyards connected by a tunnel through the central cross, which houses communal facilities. Its height is lower on the south-west corner and higher at the north-east side to make best use of daylight.

“We have now completed three remarkable buildings in Orestad, the VM Houses, The Mountain and finally the 8 House – which is the sole result of a good and constructive collaboration with talented young architects who had a good understanding for the economical aspects,” Per Hopfner, Hopfner Partners

The 8 House creates two intimate interior courtyards, separated by the centre of the cross which houses 500 m2 of communal facilities available for all residents.

Photographs by Jens Lind

Video on youtube by Channelbeta

Other stories of BIG on archiDE:
- EXPO 2010 DANISH PAVILION by BIG, Shanghai, China
- BIG wins International Competition to design Tallinn’s new City Hall
- BIG and Michel Rojkind Win Cultural Competition, Mexico
- Mountain Dwellings by BIG Architects, Copenhagen, Denmark
- Zira Island masterplan by BIG architects
-VM Houses by PLOT = big + JDS in *COPENHAGEN, Denmark*

VISIT BIG ARCHITECTS

The Fredensborg House by NORM Architects, Copenhagen, Denmark

NORM Architects have recently completed the great interior for a House near Copenhagen, Denmark.

On a sloping property north of Copenhagen, the Fredensborg House is built on five small plateaus connected by steps, reflecting the shape of its surrounding terrain. The house aesthetic is derived from inspirations brought about by the labyrinthine mountain village architecture, those that you may find familiar in Southern Europe, the architecture of Chinese temples, and in the works of modernist Danish architecture Jorn Utzon.

Via dailyicon

VISIT NORM ARCHITECTS

Middelfart Savings Bank by 3XN Architects, Middelfart, Denmark

3XNs visionary and empathetic winning proposal unites the Middelfart savings Bank’s high ambitions for their new head office. The building must ensure a perfect environment for the employees, while also positively stress demands for high architectural quality in the future development along the harbour front.

One large roof covers all functions in the building. The roof is a large elegant wooden structure with numerous openings. The openings bring in abundant amounts of daylight and allow for direct view of the sea from all places in the building, up and down. In this way, the light and friendly atmosphere sought for by the bank is achieved.

The 83 prism like skylights compose the spectacular roof surface defining the geometry of the rest of the building – in reference to the maritime environment on the harbor front as well as the surrounding timber framed buildings. The roof is designed to frame a perfect view towards the Lillebælt waters as well with a functional purpose of shading from direct sunlight.µ

The new building is carefully fitted into the context. To one side, the village is respected by following dimensions, scale and the shape of the roof. Towards the harbour the building retracts and makes way for a new, triangular space that opens for the view. From the plaza, one enters a large, indoor ‘market place’, the heart of the building. At entrance level, a bookshop, a café and a real estate agent and the cash desk is placed.

The rest of the bank’s area is spread at a series of terraces with open connections to the plaza and to each other. The terraces are connected by spacious staircases that provide good opportunities for the important informal meeting.

With its central position, the building will become a natural meeting point for clients, staff and visitors. In relation to the surrounding city, a delicate balance has been achieved a beautiful, contemporary and well functioning building that integrates respectfully in the overall picture.

Internationally renowned artist Olafur Eliasson has created an art installation for the plaza. Six ‘shooting star’ kaleidoscopes inspired by the triangular geometry of the building are lowered into the ground floor granite adding an extra dimension to the structure.

Thermoactive Hydronic Elements

In addition to developing a comprehensive and holistic sustainable strategy for each project, the Research & Development department at 3XN scans the marketplace and actively implements latest technologies and sustainable innovations into our projects.

Developed through the Danish Technical University, and now a part of the curriculum, the implementation of the latest technologies in energy efficient heating and cooling of buildings for the headquarters of Middelfart Savings Bank has been viewed as groundbreaking. The method utilizes the mass and ability of concrete to adjust the room temperature by absorbing and releasing heat. The method is based upon pre-fabricated concrete decks with embedded plastic pipes.

Large Energy Savings
With these thermoactive concrete elements it is possible to reduce the energy consumption for heating by 30 percent and the energy consumption for cooling and mechanical ventilation by up to 85 percent; in total, an energy saving of 30-50 percent. This is due to the fact that the system allows for better use of alternative supply sources, i.e. the plant can operate as a low- temperature floor heating system during winter, based upon heat-driven heat pumps, and during summer, the cool night air, soil tubes, ground water or sea water can be used for cooling.

The system is partly self-regulating as water for heating and/or cooling is circulated with a temperature only a few degrees from the desired room temperature, and this is the key to the large energy savings. In addition to energy savings the capital costs were lower due to the reduced needs for cooling and heating.

Special Thanks to Lise Roland Johansen for sharing
Photographes by Adam Mørk

More news of 3XN on ArchiDE:
+ MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR solo exhibition by 3XN Architects
+ 3XN wins architectural competition for
Frederiksberg Courthouse
+ Part2 / 3XN winning proposal for
Cultural Project in Aarhus
+ 3XN Wins
Cultural Project in Aarhus
+ 3XN
showcase pavilion ’Learning from Nature’
+ Saxo Bank by 3XN awarded
RIBA International Award 2009
+
Saxo Bank headquarters by 3XN Architects
+ 3XN wins architecture competition for the
Randers Museum of Art
+
CPH Arch by 3XN Architects in Copenhagen
+
Tivoli Concert Hall by 3XN Architects
+
Ørestad College by 3XN Architects

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR solo exhibition by 3XN Architects, DAC, Copenhagen, Denmark

MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR

HOW CAN ARCHITECTURAL SURROUNDINGS AFFECT YOUR BEHAVIOUR? Architecture can get people talking together. Architecture can calm children in the classroom. Architecture can make passive people more active. Architecture can shape corporate culture. Architecture can encourage people to find new paths, discover new aspects of their city – and of themselves. On 12 february (tomorrow) there is a grand opening of a solo exhibition of 3XN at the Danish Architecture Centre in Copenhagen. MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR invites you into 3XNs universe and gives a glimpse into the thoughts, visions and processes forming the basis of 3XNs architecture focusing on behaviour. The exhibit challenges the concept of behaviour by providing a direct and physical meeting with 4 meter high abstract building sections as well as inviting the viewer to reflect on how architecture shapes our behaviour. The exhibit displays 28 projects from the last five years of 3XNs work.

3XNs Principal Kim Herforth Nielsen explains: ”Our objective is to give the audience a direct, sensual experience of how architecture affects the way we experience things and interact with each other. At the same time, MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR initiates the public into the thoughts and processes that lie behind 3XNs architecture.”

MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR will be on display at the Danish Architecture Centre until May 13. Afterward it will be on tour. The exhibit is followed by a book, which will be published March 4 in connection with an international summit on ‘Behaviour and the Built Environment’. For further information regarding the event please visit www.dac.dk Special thanks to Lisa Roland for sharing. Photographs are made by  Adam Mørk

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

&
VISIT
DAC.DK FOR MORE INFORMATION

3XN wins architectural competition for Frederiksberg Courthouse, Denmark

3XN has won a architectural competition for the design of the Courthouse in Frederiksberg in Denmark.

The expansion of the Courthouse in Frederiksberg, Denmark, will be a sculptural and classic structure, which at once expresses a welcoming transparency while maintaining the justice system’s sobriety and seriousness.

The new Courthouse will be a natural extension of the existing neo-classical building, yet still maintaining its own identity through a modern and contemporary expression.  The building design is therefore composed with clear references to the architectural style of the refined neighborhood of Frederiksberg.  The form of the structure is both classic and dynamic – standing as a modern interpretation of the classical saddle style roof.

The interior of the courthouse focuses on compliance with the law reform’s requirements on security and internal segregations in the building.  Therefore, the building provides its employees, the defendants, witnesses and guests an open and friendly environment in which it is easy for the different user groups to navigate.

A small atrium cuts through the middle of the building; drawing light deep into the interior creating an open and airy connection across departments.  This creates the feeling of direct daylight in the rooms and gives a general lightness to the building’s inner core, meeting the visitors as they come up from the foyer.

The Courthouse is expected for completion during the first half of 2012.

Special Thanks to Lise Roland Johansen from 3XN
All images and text are from 3XN!

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

Part2 / 3XN winning proposal for Cultural Project in Aarhus, Denmark

05

Here are some more pictures of Danish Firm 3XN Architects winning proposal. The competition was to transform the former freight train halls in Aarhus, Denmark into a new and dynamic cultural center. The winning design was part of an collaboration effort with Nord Arkitekter, Hans Ulrik Jensen A/S,Exner Studio, and Søren Jensen Engineers.
01

02

03

04

09


Special thanks to Lise Roland Johansen from 3XN!

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

3XN Wins Cultural Project in Aarhus, Denmark

013XN has won an Architectural Competition to transform the former freight train halls in Aarhus Denmark into a new and dynamic cultural center.

A new cultural hub for scenography, visual arts and literature will soon be constructed within a historical framework in Denmark’s second largest city, Aarhus.  The new cultural center is meant to be an inspiring setting that stimulates production of the arts and facilitates the interaction amongst the various artistic metiers, business and education.

3XNs proposal adds elements of nature, with green spaces injecting a natural raw quality which plays up to the historic nature of the existing halls which were used for rail freight in the past.

The jury’s decision on the winning proposal was based on the project being a ’facilitating link, historical, functional and comprising an architectural spatiality’.

The building is expected to be a flexible space with optimal usage of more than 9,000 m2.  The project is comprised of the renovation of the existing freight halls along with a new building with rooms and large scale auditoria.  The roof of the building will appear as an extension of the green space – and indeed will take the form of a green ‘carpet’ over the new building.  There are a number of other green initiatives that will be brought to the project – primarily with a view to reducing the building’s electricity needs for ventilation, pumps and lighting.

02

The Cultural Production Center is expected to be completed in 2012 and is a collaboration between the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark and the Realdania Foundation.

The winning team was comprised of 3XN Architects, Hans Ulrik Jensen A/S, Exners Studio, Nord Arkitekter and Søren Jensen Engineers.

Soon more pictures! Special thanks to Lise Roland Johansen from 3XN!

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

Spiral House by Powerhouse Company, Burgundy, France

01Copenhagen- and Rotterdam based architects Powerhouse Company have completed a spiral-shaped  extension to a house in Burgundy, France. Called Spiral House, the extension is arranged around a central patio, where the visitors can enter the structure.

02

“We want a house with a twist, a house that has something something to say.”

The Spiral house is an extension of an existing house. Set amongst a generous property covering 13.000m2, crossed by a small river and planted with a wide variety of old ornamental trees, the Spiral House rests within the pastoral charm of the Burgundy landscape.

04

05

Despite its traditional architecture the existing house struggled to inhabit and occupy the expansive garden. In contrast the Spiral House expands freely into the garden, seeking to create as many experiences of the garden as possible. 06

In a gentle lift from the ground floor to the roof level it creates a surprising variety of spaces that blur the boundaries between the house and the garden where the architecture and the landscape merge together.

07

In wrapping the house around a planted patio the Spiral House is reminiscent of a french ‘Clos’: an enclosed vineyard common to the famous landscape of the region. In the Spiral House the ‘Clos’ is transformed into an inviting gesture, the peripheral wall is lifted and twisted to create a spiral. In turn it creates a continuous invitation from outside to inside and a continuous movement from the entrance to the more intimate rooms of the house.

08

09

The patio, the covered terrace and the panoramic views serve to connect the house with the garden, inviting the guests to unwind and enjoy the garden’s tranquillity. Its geometry grew out of the internal organization of the house mixed with the particular requests of the client. Large and open rooms with high ceilings are used on the ground floor for the living room and library, while smaller, more intimate spaces are used for two guest suites. It also includes a multipurpose dorm/playroom for the kids and their friends.

10

1112

Visit villa 1 by Powerhouse Company on archiDE, here

Photographs are by Bas Princen. Drawings are by Charles Bessard, architect-in-charge and partner of Powerhouse Company.

VISIT POWERHOUSE COMPANY

3XN showcase pavilion ’Learning from Nature’, Denmark

07_052_pavillon,DK,3XN

’Learning from Nature’

Self-cleaning surfaces, phase changing materials and built-in sensors that generate energy from the footsteps of the visitors. The 3XN pavilion ‘Learning from Nature’ unites the most advanced technologies and intelligent materials in a preview of the innovative architectural design of tomorrow

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art invited the Danish architecture firm 3XN to design a pavilion demonstrating cutting edge possibilities within sustainable and intelligent materials. The result is a pavilion that is built of bio composites with integrated intelligence that creates a dynamic interaction with its physical surroundings and its users.

07_052_pavillon,DK,3XN


07_052_pavillon,DK,3XN

Sustainability does not equal architectural compromise

The pavilion is called ‘Learning from Nature’ and everything about the pavilion is literally inspired by nature itself: The biological cycle of nature is the fundamental basis for the shape, the materials and the dynamic energy generation. The pavilion is shaped as a Moebius band to symbolize the biological cycle; and the properties of the construction are very like those of nature – for example, the pavilion has a coating of nanoparticles that helps clean the surfaces and clean the air. Additionally, the pavilion is built of biodegradable materials; and as for energy, the pavilion is 100 percent self-sufficient.

louisiana_25

Kim Herforth Nielsen, Principal of 3XN, comments on the project:

- The Pavilion has given us the opportunity to showcase the possibilities which exist in building with sustainable and intelligent materials. Our objective has been to show that Green Architecture can be dynamic and active.  We often think that we need to minimize use of resources at all costs. Instead of focusing on consuming the least amount of energy, we need to focus on producing and using energy and materials in a more intelligent way than is the case today.

07_052_pavillon,DK,3XN

The development of the pavilion is a natural continuation of 3XNs extensive focus on new technologies and materials; a focus that led to the establishment of a unique in-house Research & Development unit in 2007. Since then, 3XN has built an international reputation as one of the most visionary and ambitious architecture firms in the field.

’Learning from Nature’ is unveiled today and can be seen at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, until October.

Special Thanks to Lise Roland Johansen

VISIT 3XN ARCHITECTS

BIG wins International Competition to design Tallinn’s new City Hall

BIG - Tallinn City Hall

Bjarke Ingels Group and Adams Kara Taylor have won an international contest to design Tallinn’s new City Hall in Estonia.

The purpose of the international idea contest was to find the best architectural solution for the new administrative building of the city government that will be situated on a 35,000 m2 plot near the Linnahall building. The contest for the new city was met with a great interest, 81 architects and their teams were willing to present an entry. Of those, the international jury chose the best 9 to shortlist as finalists into the second phase of the competition. By May 15 the finalists handed in their final solutions. The international jury’s decision to award BIG’s entry first place in the competition was unanimous and was presided by the vice mayor Taavi Aas.

01

BIG - Tallinn City Hall BIG - Tallinn City Hall BIG - Tallinn City Hall

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Partner-in-Charge
There is a saying that success has many fathers. That is especially true when designing such a crucial public building and public space as a town hall. The design needs to be shaped by input from neighbours and users, citizens and politicians. Paradoxically we architects often find ourselves isolated from this crucial dialogue at the moment of conception, due to the anonymity of the architectural competition. Since this was a 2 stage competition, we already had our first feedback from the jury – causing us to dramatically rearrange our design to fit the citizens’ needs. As a result we have envisioned a very elastic structure – capable of adapting to unexpected demands. We see it as the first conversation in a design dialogue we look forward to continue.

BIG - Tallinn City Hall

02

Public Insight + Political Overview
Good governance and participatory democracy is dependent on transparency in both directions. It requires adequate political overview of the problems, demands and desires of the public, as well as public insight into the political processes. The new town hall of Tallinn will provide this two way transparency in a very literal way. The various public departments form a porous canopy above the public service market place allowing both daylight and view to permeate the structure. The public servants won’t be some remote administrators taking decisions behind thick walls, but will be visible in their daily work from all over the market place via the light wells and courtyards. From outside the panoramic windows allow the citizens to see their city at work. In reverse the public servants will be able to look out and into the market place’s making sure that the city and its citizens are never out of sight nor mind.

BIG - Tallinn City Hall

Jakob Lange, BIG, Project Leader
The Town hall is not only surrounded by public space – but literally invaded by the citizens in the form of the public service market place beneath the canopy of the public offices, where the citizens of Tallinn can meet their public servants.

04

Democratic Tower
The City Council, the heart of the democratic process, is located in the town hall tower visible from the park, the plaza and the podium of the Linnen Hall. The roof of the tower is tilted forming a slender spire. Inside the City Council greeting hall is accessed via the grand stair or elevators directly from the market place, or from the City offices around it. Above the greeting hall, the City Council is located in a generous space illuminated though a large window facing the city. A balcony for press and visitors flanks the space on the level above. The sloping ceiling of the tower is finished in a large reflective material. The mirror ceiling transforms the tower into a huge democratic periscope allowing literal transparency between politicians and public. In ancient times the town hall would have a vaulted ceiling decorated with a sky or frescos of the land and territories under the ruler’s government. In the new town hall of Tallinn the ceiling will be a real (reflected) overview of the city both old and new. Whenever a politician raises his/her glance, he/she will be met with the view of Tallinn’s townscape. In reverse, the citizens, rallying protesters or simply people passing by, will look towards the tower, and within it get an insight into the political work. The circular formation of council members will be reflected in the tilted ceiling, and give the surrounding citizens a sense of assurance that the democracy is busy working for them. In a traditional tower only the king at the top gets to enjoy the great view. The periscope is a form of democratic tower, where even the average Tallinn citizen on the street gets to enjoy the overview from the top. From a distance the silhouette of the town hall tower enters the family of Tallinn’s historical spires including those of the Niguliste Museum-Concert Hall, Toomkirik, Kaarli Kirik, Pühavaimu Kirik, St. Olav Church and the current town hall.

03

Hanif Kara, Adams Kara Taylor

The structural concept reflects the simplicity of the architectural intent; a grouping of “easily assembled individual Frames” that through vierendeel frames free the connection of the city at ground level whilst simultaneously act as a “group” to resist lateral loads. The result is an economic ,fast build adaptable solution.

BIG - Tallinn City Hall

The Jury
The international idea contest was jointly organized by the City Planning Department and the Union of Estonian Architects. The members of the jury were: Head Architect of Tallinn Endrik Mänd, Administrative Director of the Tallinn City Office Viljar Meister, head Architect of Riga Janis Dripe, architect Tarald Lundevall from Norway, architect Peter Wilson from Germany, architects Martin Aunin, Tiit Trummal, Kalle Komissarov, and Andres Levald as a substitute member. The winning project was awarded with 500,000 Estonian kroons. The mayor of Tallinn Edgar Savisaar stated contentment with the results of the competition, thanked all the participants and expressed his hope that the new administrative building of Tallinn will be built sooner or later, despite the hard times in the European economy.

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Partner-in-Charge
For a Danish architect it is a special honour to design the new town hall of Tallinn – cause after all – they designed our flag.

05

06

07

THE TALLINN TOWN HALL CREDIT LIST:ARCHITECT BIG
PROJECT TALLINN TOWN HALL
CLIENT CITY PLANNING OFFICE, CITY OF TALLINN
COLLABORATORS AKT
SIZE 28.000 M2
LOCATION TALLINN, ESTONIA
TYPE OPEN IDEAS COMPETITION
STATUS 1st PRIZE

VISIT BIG ARCHITECTS!

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Het Esquire thema.

Volg

Ontvang elk nieuw bericht direct in je inbox.

Doe mee met 86 andere volgers